PTI
PTI Curriculum Units Events FAQ Contact Links
IMGALTTAG
IMGALTTAG Volume I: Coming Over:  The "Old" Immigration


Anthony Burns:  A Man Kidnapped
Sharon Griffeth
Washington Polytechnic Academy 

This is a curriculum unit designed for Eighth Grade American History teachers to use with their students in February for Black History Month, but it could be used to supplement any part of the Civil War curriculum. It revolves around the life and trial of Anthony Burns, a fugitive slave captured in Boston in 1854. His arrest and capture set off the Boston Slave Riot and stirred the anti-slavery sentiment of the North. The activities in the unit are centered on reading primary source materials from that period of time. The unit will include making a time-line, researching the fugitive slave law, making a chart from runaway slave ads, doing a group project, doing role-plays, participating in a mock trial, and writing an essay on runaway slaves.  It will take three weeks to complete.


Click here to view complete unit.
IMGALTAG

Irish Need Not Apply!
(Analyzing Primary Sources)
Judith Karavlan

This curriculum unit on immigration targets eighth grade students studying United States History. Students generally welcome the opportunity to become active learners and are eager to solve a series of historical problems themselves rather than simply being told about the past. Therefore, students will actually analyze a wide variety of primary-source material on Irish immigrants, make inferences and draw conclusions based on available evidence. The unit, with its primary documents, cartoons, and support materials, will allow both teacher and student to enhance their study of the history of immigration beyond the textbook and classroom.


Click here to view complete unit.
IMGALTAG

Immigration: “Give Me Your Tried, Your Poor, Your Huddled Masses”
By Robert R. Redmond
Schenley High School

Between 1850 and 1930 millions of immigrants sailed pass the Statue of Liberty to become American citizens. Often high school students learn about immigrants after they have step foot on American soil. Rarely do they study the push factors that encouraged them to leave their homelands. This curriculum unit is designed to teach those important push factors, the triggering events, which precipitated so many to immigrate. For a starting point, students will examine the words of The New Colossus to decipher the political, economic and social conditions in Europe during this period.  The story of Angela’s Ashes will be used to take students to depression era Ireland, to look at conditions there and respond. Russia Jewish immigrants tell stories of persecution under the Czar and exploitation in America’s garment industry.

Equally important, students will examine the ideologies of social Darwinism and Marxism to determine how it influenced treatment of the downtrodden both here and abroad. Give Me Your Tired, Your poor, Your Huddled Masses is a researched based curriculum for high school students. Its purpose is to discover innumerable reasons why so many went to such extraordinary means, suffered acute prolonged adversities, travel long distances under horrendous circumstances, left their cultures, extended families, to come to America.


Click here to view complete unit.
IMGALTAG

Primary Sources Speak:  Part 2—
The Harmonists of Western Pennsylvania
Dr. Don Roberts

This curriculum unit was written specifically for eighth grade American History teachers, but Language Arts teachers might team-teach this with the Social Studies teachers. High school civics teachers might use all or part of this curriculum as a case study of religious freedom and the 19th century utopian movement in America. Basically, the curriculum requires students to interpret a variety of primary sources that give a specific shape and dimension to a distinct group of 19th century Germanic immigrants to Butler County. The same approach to interpreting primary sources that was used in a previous curriculum, “Primary Sources Speak:  Documenting Westward Expansion,” has been repeated in this curriculum. Teachers will find several worksheets and activities that educationally support each of the primary sources.


Click here to view complete unit.
IMGALTAG

Old Immigration
New York Ports of Entry Before Ellis: Through Immigrant Accounts
Bethany Sage

It is true that no matter where in the world immigrants came from, once they landed in the United States many faced similar challenges and triumphs. But a misconception that many Americans have is that the process the immigrants went through to enter this land was also similar, despite when and where they entered the United States. After reflection on this misconception, this unit was written to reflect the different experiences the Old Immigrants faced while entering the United States, through their own words. This unit focuses on immigration to the United States before Ellis Island was opened and highlights some of the earlier immigrant groups to enter the United States. Although there were numerous ports open to immigrants throughout United States history, this unit focuses only on the ports of New York from 1855 to 1900. The port in New York serviced the majority of people entering the United States. This unit focuses specifically on the events leading up to the creation of Castle Garden, the era of Castle Garden, and its eventual closure.

The activities in this unit will serve as a bridge between the tenth grade World Cultures curriculum and the eleventh grade United States History curriculum and will highlight how World History and United States History are tied together. After completing the unit, students should be better prepared to examine the lives, cultures, and beliefs of the people who chose to make the United States their new home from the various countries in Western Europe. Through the use of primary documents the students will be able to examine the lives of different groups of people and learn about what it was like to leave everything behind and immigrate to a new land.


Click here to view complete unit.
IMGALTAG

Illustrations of Racism Against Chinese Immigrants
Paul Schaltenbrand 

Since the 9-11 tragedy, the fact that the U.S. has a significant population of people visiting and living here from other parts of the world has come into a very scrutinizing light. The actions of an extremely small group has unfortunately placed the freedoms and liberties of all immigrants in jeopardy. As educators, we must help our students understand that persecution of people who come from another country is morally wrong and violates the basic foundation that the United States was built on. After all, how many of us can actually say that their ancestors were born in the United States ? Almost all of us have parents or grandparents who were themselves foreigners in a new world. This unit is designed to help our students develop a sense of personal history and provide them with information about the Chinese experience in America. Examining this one group of early immigrants students understand the hardships and discriminations that many immigrants  endured and will hopefully inspire them to research and explore the history of their own family. The students can them gain an understanding of how America was created and that persecution of any immigrant group violates the whole foundation of our country.


Click here to view complete unit.
IMGALTAG

A Child’s Eye View: The Immigration Experience in Pittsburgh
Liz Speca 

A Child’s Eye View: The Immigrant Experience in Pittsburgh is an interdisciplinary unit designed to be used with middle to upper elementary school aged children (grades four through six). The unit endeavors to provide a greater understanding of the lives of immigrant children in the 1840’s, and a greater appreciation for their own local history. Special attention has been made to include some information specific to the area in which my school is located (South Side/Mt. Oliver/Carrick). Activities are included that touch on a wide variety of subject areas including math, reading, language arts, technology, geography and history. The unit will culminate with students producing (as a group) a work of historical fiction based on their own research.


Click here to view complete unit.
IMGALTAG

Chatham University
IMGALTTAG
IMGALTTAG
IMGALTTAG Pittsburgh Teachers Institute
Jointly sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University, Chatham University and the Pittsburgh Public Schools.
IMGALTTAG
IMGALTTAG