Chatham University

Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) Learning Outcomes

Program Goals and Student Learning Outcomes

The curriculum design consists of three threads and three levels. The learning experiences are designed to enable the graduate to demonstrate the three major program outcomes at a level consistent with candidacy for entry-level practice:

Outcome #1: Professional Reasoning

Professional Reasoningis defined as "the process that practitioners use to plan, direct, perform, and reflect on client care" (Schell, 2014). Professional reasoning begins with critical thinking which includes the process of evaluating and judging the accuracy of information through questioning and probing of ideas in order to make informed conclusions (Ruggiero, 2014).

Beginning Level: The student will:

  • understand the dimensions of the professional reasoning process across the domains of occupational therapy.
  • understand the importance and the impact of context and environment (cultural, personal, temporal, physical, virtual, and social) on occupational engagement.
  • identify client centered occupational performance problems and ask appropriate questions.
  • describe the value and relevance of evidence-based practice in the OT process.

Intermediate Level: The student will:

  • generate possible solutions in response to client centered occupational performance problems.
  • synthesize new concepts with previously learned information to make decisions regarding evaluation and intervention.
  • begin to use evidence to support and guide decision making.

Advanced Level: The student/graduate will:

  • recognize the role of experience and ongoing self-directed learning in professional reasoning.
  • incorporate evidence-based practice skills in the OT process.
  • examine and analyze the dynamic relationship between the person, environment and occupation in order to choose and/or modify an appropriate course of action.

Outcome #2:

Occupational Therapy Knowledge and Skills is defined as a dynamic understanding of the theoretical tenets, the domain and process of occupational therapy (AOTA, 2014), and the competent application of that knowledge to OT practice

Beginning Level: The student will:

  • articulate the basic tenets and foundational history of the profession, including the power of occupation to support health and participation, the concept of client centeredness as a core principle of the profession.
  • understand and use structured interviews, directed observations, and standardized/non-standardized assessment tools, and discuss and document results using professional terminology.
  • identify and describe the domain and process of occupational therapy.
  • define the importance of therapeutic use of self in the occupational therapy process.

Intermediate Level: The student will:

  • select and administer appropriate evaluation methods/tools, including scoring, interpreting and documenting results.
  • formulate and implement a client centered intervention plan, guided by the occupational profile, conceptual practice models of practice, and the best available evidence.
  • demonstrate appropriate therapeutic use of self in a variety of contexts.

Advanced Level: The student/graduate will:

  • modify therapeutic use of self in response to the needs of clients
  • adapt evaluation, intervention, and service delivery methods to meet the dynamic needs of clients.
  • apply knowledge and strategies related to the management of occupational therapy services, including program development, marketing, program evaluation, and reimbursement.

Outcome # 3:

Professional Growth and Development encompasses a myriad of experiences that promote sustainable professional growth including servant leadership, enculturation into the profession, ongoing self-assessment, and engagement in continuing education and scholarly endeavors.

Beginning Level: The student will:

  • identify and articulate an understanding of behaviors that are consistent with the AOTA Code of Ethics, national, regional and local governing bodies and their implications for practice.
  • understand the role and importance of professional organizations associated with occupational therapy practice.
  • identify and demonstrate behaviors consistent with the role of a professional, including verbal and nonverbal communication, servant leadership, and active engagement in the learning process.

Intermediate Level: The student will:

  • demonstrate behaviors that are consistent with ethical and legal practice guidelines.
  • identify and use resources and opportunities for professional and scholarly development.
  • reflect upon their own professional development and identify areas of strength, areas for improvement, and goals for professional growth

Advanced Level: The student/graduate will:

  • generate options for reconciling ethical and/or legal issues and articulate an understanding of the issues relevant to all parties.
  • modify professional presentation and level of content to meet the needs of the person, group, and/or organization.
  • integrate leadership skills and personal strengths to serve in the multifaceted roles of an occupational therapy advocate.
  • develop a plan for continued scholarly and professional activities.
  • engage in professional and scholarly endeavors.