Chatham University

Education Curriculum

Requirements for Recommendation for State Certification in Teaching

The Teacher Preparation Program is a professional program offering teacher certification in early elementary education (N-4), secondary (7-12), biology, chemistry, English, mathematics, physics, and social studies. The Teacher Preparation Program also offers K-12 certification in art, environmental education, and special education. Programs in these areas will require some coursework in both elementary and secondary education. Candidates for these certifications should contact the certification officer or program director.

Major Requirements

The Liberal Arts Major in Early Elementary Education offers a comprehensive preparation program for teaching young children, predicated on a foundation in the liberal arts. Students in the program are required to complete the general education requirements, as well as the sequence of professional preparation courses. Students in secondary and K-12 certification areas must complete the general education requirements, a major in the academic discipline, as well as the sequence of professional preparation courses.

This program involves both classroom study and extensive field experiences, culminating in a 14 or 16 week Student Teaching experience. In accordance with the Pennsylvania State Department of Education requirements, candidates also must satisfy all regulations pertaining to teacher training contained in the Pennsylvania School Code. These regulations are subject to change by the State. Students will be required to comply with any such regulations that are instituted before their certifications have been received.

To gain admission to the program, candidates must successfully complete 48 credit hours of coursework at Chatham with a cumulative 3.0 GPA. They must also submit passing scores on the PRAXIS pre-professional examinations that meet PDE requirements.

Program Requirements

+ Liberal Arts: Early Elementary Education

EDU104 Perspectives on Education

Students examine the role of teachers and schools in past and contemporary society. Selected educational issues are analyzed including role of technology in the classroom, legal issues for teachers, school-community relations, and current legislative initiatives. A 16 hour field placement is embedded in this course. Additional Fee(s): Field Placement Fee

3
EDC105 Child Development: Birth through grade 4

This course addresses physical, social, cognitivie, and moral development from prenatal stages through middle chlidhood. Students examine child development in teh context of social, cultural, instructional settings. Using case studies, the implications of growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning is achieved. Students learn to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive and challengin for all children.

3
EDU108 Play and Movement

A range of games and activities are explored in terms of functional movements and progression towards mature forms of selected physical skills. Healthy warm-up and participation strategies will be part of the exploration of each game. Games will be analyzed in terms of developmental appropriatemenss and the involvement of certain muscle groups and skill requirements. Students design an original game targeting the development of age-specific skills.

1
EDU205 Classroom Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners

This course explores how effective language development results in children who successfully learn to read and can use reading effectively in academic subject areas and to negotiate the world. A major focus of this course is on information and methods for enhancing the literacy and academic experiences of students in grades K-12 classified as English as second language (ELL) students.

3
EDU207 Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education

Students in this course will examine current and contemporary issues surrounding early childhood education. Class discussions focus on sociological, psychological, political, and economic forces shaping families, children and early educational experiences. Students will explore the connection between curriculum and physical environment. Major approaches and theories in early childhood curriculum are explored in terms of the cognitive, social and physical dimensions. Emphasis is placed on the physical expression of early childhood learning theory. Issues of health and safety, including state and federal regulations are also explored.

3
EDU219W Cognitive Learning Theories

This course addresses brain and cognitive development from prenatal stages through middle childhood. Students examine child development in the context of learning theories. The implications of physical and social growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning are explored. A field experience where theories and concepts can be observed is part of this course and serves to inform classroom discussion and activities.

3
EDU227 Literacy

This course is designed to equip graduating teachers to produce readers who are successful in teh classroom and on standardized tests and use reading effectively to negotiate the world through the presentation of theory, research and practical strategies associated with the teaching of literacy skills. For the purposes of this course, literacy will be defined as one's ability to use language in order to listen, speak, read and write across the curriculum.

3
EDU234 Inclusion: Issues and Strategies

This course provides the conceptual framework for understanding inclusion issues in our public schools. The students discuss the variety of exceptionalities found in public school settings and the resultant impact of inclusion policy upon instructional practice. A field placement is embedded in this course. Prerequisite(s): EDU 100, 102, 103, 104 and 208. Additional Fee: Field Placement Fee.

3
EDU230 Mathematical Foundations

This course relates the principles and process skills of basic mathematics to effective teaching with the best practices in the classrom. Concrete experiences iwth manipulatives and hands-on learning are an important piece in this course. In this course, studetns will acquire the skills necessary for informed decision-making in planning, facilitation of learning based on knowledge or research, best practices, state and national performances standards, and assessments.

3
EDU304 Diversity: A Family Matter

Diversity in terms of culture, community, extended and insular families, and the ecological dimensions of human development are all areas for exploration in this course.

3
EDU319 Methods of Teaching Elementary Social Studies

This course is a study of the resources and methods of teaching elementary social studies including geography and culture. Links to literature and the fine arts are part of this exploration of a thematic integration of social studies in classroom activitities. A structured field experience is part of this course. Prerequisite(s): EDU 100, 102, 103, 208, and 212

3
EDU328 Literacy II: Connections to Literature

This course provides a foundation for selecting age, development, and cultural-appropriate literature that engages children and provides links to reading and writing in content areas. Students evaluate authors, illustrators, and study the varioustypes of literature common to early elementary experiences that develop their emotional, social, language, cognitive, and creative talents.

3
EDU335 Methods of Teaching Elementary Mathematics

This course is designed to examine and explore recent research developments related to national efforts to reform the teaching and learning of mathematics. Students explore the teaching of mathematics in grades K-8 within the context of child development and learning theroy. Research-based curriculum projects are explored in terms of their ability to promote deep conceptual understanding in mathematics. Considerations involved in examining or developing assessment tasks, instruments, and frameworks are addressed in relation to the content taught. Emphasis also is placed on reviewing specific content topics in math to increase the student's won competencies in these disciplines.

3
EDC336 Elementary Science Methods

This course presents concepts, processes, and skills essential to the elementary school science program. The standards set by the National Science Teachers Association serve as a framework for the course. Inquiry teaching and learning are experienced through research-based national programs.

3
EDU400 Data Driven Instruction Decisions

The importance of making decisions based on actual data collected on students now plays a major role in all schools. The data that needs to be reviewed goes beyond standardized test results and needs to include both summative and formative assessment results. The connection between the curriculum and the assessments utilized to assess a student’s progress along the curriculum needs to be viewed as a guide to effective educational decision making. Students entering the educational profession need a background in types of assessments and how data collected from such assessments can meet the needs of students in the context of the curriculum.

2
EDU409 Differentiated Reading and Writing

This course provides the regular and special education teacher with specific data-based knowledge and skills to teach reading and writing to students with disabilities. Strategies to develop conceptual understanding in the content areas are equally important for the beginning and more accomplished learner. Projects include developing lessons that differentiate instructional practive and assessment to help all students achieve.

3
EDU411 Early Elementary Curriculum

This course will explore both the theoretical framework and the practical strategies that teachers will utilize as they design learning situations to meet these challenges. Students will learn and apply a variety of techniques for designing lesson and unit plans, integrating curriculum across subject areas, addressing state standards, authentically assessing children, implementing positive classroom management strategies and involving parents in the classroom. Particular attention will be given to the topic of differentiation and the exploration of instructional strategies.

3
EDU422 Pre-Student Teaching

In this two-day/week field experience, the pre-service teacher gains experiences that will allow him/her to practice, develop, and demonstrate Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Stage Three competencies through meaningful interactions with students and qualified mentors. Candidates are provided with frequent supervision in a collaborative school-university partnership with a local district. Prerequisites: Approved application to Pre-Student Teaching that includes designated number of credits, GPA, and appropriate clearances.

3
EDU430 Diverse Family and Community Partnerships

Advocates, educators, and parents have called for more and better family-school partnerships for decades. Recently, a body of empirical evidence has indicated that partnerships can have a positive impact. A number of studies highlight the positive associations between parent involvement in schools and their children's social and emotional development and academic achievement. This course explores the form and focus of several types of partnership.

3
EDU413 Elementary Student Teaching

9
EDU431 Assessment and Adaptation

Students investigate the assessment of indiciduals with mild to moderate disabilities. Topics include the fundamental principles of assessment tools and the social reponsibility of professionals to exercise fairness and accuracy in the assessment process.

3
EDU498 Tutorial: Education

4
EDU499 Tutorial: Education

4

+ Secondary Education Certification

EDU104 Perspectives on Education

Students examine the role of teachers and schools in past and contemporary society. Selected educational issues are analyzed including role of technology in the classroom, legal issues for teachers, school-community relations, and current legislative initiatives. A 16 hour field placement is embedded in this course. Additional Fee(s): Field Placement Fee

3
EDU109 Adolescent Development

This course addresses physical, social, cognitive, and moral development during adolescence. The physical, social, and cognitive changes during puberty are explored in terms of their impact on student participation and performance in school settings. Through the use of case studies, an understanding of the implications of growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning is achieved.

3
EDU205 Classroom Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners

This course explores how effective language development results in children who successfully learn to read and can use reading effectively in academic subject areas and to negotiate the world. A major focus of this course is on information and methods for enhancing the literacy and academic experiences of students in grades K-12 classified as English as second language (ELL) students.

3
EDU207 Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education

Students in this course will examine current and contemporary issues surrounding early childhood education. Class discussions focus on sociological, psychological, political, and economic forces shaping families, children and early educational experiences. Students will explore the connection between curriculum and physical environment. Major approaches and theories in early childhood curriculum are explored in terms of the cognitive, social and physical dimensions. Emphasis is placed on the physical expression of early childhood learning theory. Issues of health and safety, including state and federal regulations are also explored.

3
EDU219W Cognitive Learning Theories

This course addresses brain and cognitive development from prenatal stages through middle childhood. Students examine child development in the context of learning theories. The implications of physical and social growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning are explored. A field experience where theories and concepts can be observed is part of this course and serves to inform classroom discussion and activities.

3
EDU227 Literacy

This course is designed to equip graduating teachers to produce readers who are successful in teh classroom and on standardized tests and use reading effectively to negotiate the world through the presentation of theory, research and practical strategies associated with the teaching of literacy skills. For the purposes of this course, literacy will be defined as one's ability to use language in order to listen, speak, read and write across the curriculum.

3
EDU234 Inclusion: Issues and Strategies

This course provides the conceptual framework for understanding inclusion issues in our public schools. The students discuss the variety of exceptionalities found in public school settings and the resultant impact of inclusion policy upon instructional practice. A field placement is embedded in this course. Prerequisite(s): EDU 100, 102, 103, 104 and 208. Additional Fee: Field Placement Fee.

3
EDU230 Mathematical Foundations

This course relates the principles and process skills of basic mathematics to effective teaching with the best practices in the classrom. Concrete experiences iwth manipulatives and hands-on learning are an important piece in this course. In this course, studetns will acquire the skills necessary for informed decision-making in planning, facilitation of learning based on knowledge or research, best practices, state and national performances standards, and assessments.

3
EDU304 Diversity: A Family Matter

Diversity in terms of culture, community, extended and insular families, and the ecological dimensions of human development are all areas for exploration in this course.

3
EDU319 Methods of Teaching Elementary Social Studies

This course is a study of the resources and methods of teaching elementary social studies including geography and culture. Links to literature and the fine arts are part of this exploration of a thematic integration of social studies in classroom activitities. A structured field experience is part of this course. Prerequisite(s): EDU 100, 102, 103, 208, and 212

3
EDU328 Literacy II: Connections to Literature

This course provides a foundation for selecting age, development, and cultural-appropriate literature that engages children and provides links to reading and writing in content areas. Students evaluate authors, illustrators, and study the varioustypes of literature common to early elementary experiences that develop their emotional, social, language, cognitive, and creative talents.

3
EDU335 Methods of Teaching Elementary Mathematics

This course is designed to examine and explore recent research developments related to national efforts to reform the teaching and learning of mathematics. Students explore the teaching of mathematics in grades K-8 within the context of child development and learning theroy. Research-based curriculum projects are explored in terms of their ability to promote deep conceptual understanding in mathematics. Considerations involved in examining or developing assessment tasks, instruments, and frameworks are addressed in relation to the content taught. Emphasis also is placed on reviewing specific content topics in math to increase the student's won competencies in these disciplines.

3
EDC336 Elementary Science Methods

This course presents concepts, processes, and skills essential to the elementary school science program. The standards set by the National Science Teachers Association serve as a framework for the course. Inquiry teaching and learning are experienced through research-based national programs.

3
EDU400 Data Driven Instruction Decisions

The importance of making decisions based on actual data collected on students now plays a major role in all schools. The data that needs to be reviewed goes beyond standardized test results and needs to include both summative and formative assessment results. The connection between the curriculum and the assessments utilized to assess a student’s progress along the curriculum needs to be viewed as a guide to effective educational decision making. Students entering the educational profession need a background in types of assessments and how data collected from such assessments can meet the needs of students in the context of the curriculum.

2
EDU409 Differentiated Reading and Writing

This course provides the regular and special education teacher with specific data-based knowledge and skills to teach reading and writing to students with disabilities. Strategies to develop conceptual understanding in the content areas are equally important for the beginning and more accomplished learner. Projects include developing lessons that differentiate instructional practive and assessment to help all students achieve.

3
EDU411 Early Elementary Curriculum

This course will explore both the theoretical framework and the practical strategies that teachers will utilize as they design learning situations to meet these challenges. Students will learn and apply a variety of techniques for designing lesson and unit plans, integrating curriculum across subject areas, addressing state standards, authentically assessing children, implementing positive classroom management strategies and involving parents in the classroom. Particular attention will be given to the topic of differentiation and the exploration of instructional strategies.

3
EDU422 Pre-Student Teaching

In this two-day/week field experience, the pre-service teacher gains experiences that will allow him/her to practice, develop, and demonstrate Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Stage Three competencies through meaningful interactions with students and qualified mentors. Candidates are provided with frequent supervision in a collaborative school-university partnership with a local district. Prerequisites: Approved application to Pre-Student Teaching that includes designated number of credits, GPA, and appropriate clearances.

3
EDU430 Diverse Family and Community Partnerships

Advocates, educators, and parents have called for more and better family-school partnerships for decades. Recently, a body of empirical evidence has indicated that partnerships can have a positive impact. A number of studies highlight the positive associations between parent involvement in schools and their children's social and emotional development and academic achievement. This course explores the form and focus of several types of partnership.

3
EDU413 Elementary Student Teaching

9
EDU431 Assessment and Adaptation

Students investigate the assessment of indiciduals with mild to moderate disabilities. Topics include the fundamental principles of assessment tools and the social reponsibility of professionals to exercise fairness and accuracy in the assessment process.

3
EDU498 Tutorial: Education

4
EDU499 Tutorial: Education

4

One* of the following courses is required:

EDU416 Methods of Teaching Secondary English

This course addresses the theory and philosophy of teaching language arts in middle and secondary schools. Classroom teaching strategies are explored and implemented in class presentations and in grades 7-12 public classrooms. Students plan instructional situations that clearly express the reading-writing connection that exists in effective language arts programs. FP Embedded: 16 hours Prerequisites: Education 100, 102, 104 Co-requisites: 317, 426 and 426F.

3
EDU417 Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Studies

This course intends to develop teaching/learning styles that research has shown are most effective for teaching social studies to adolescents. Contextual teaching, problem based learning and critical thinking are approached through instructional strategies that combine investigative classroom inquiry with both national and state content standards. Students learn to frame issues, help students research and analyze data and information and to construct meaning and understanding. Prerequisites: Education 100, 102, 104. Co-requisites: 317, 426 and 426F.

3
EDU418 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science

Examination of current theory and practice for teaching science in secondary schools is explored in this course. Curriculum development, teaching strategies and methodologies, and assessment issues are also addressed. Students examine research-based curriculum and inquiry teaching and learning as best practices in science education. Prerequisites: Education 100, 102, 104 Co-requisites: 317, 426 and 426F.

3
EDU419 Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics

A balance of theory and practice is explored in this course to help students become effective teachers of mathematics. Curriculum development, teaching strategies and methodologies, and assessment issues are also addressed. Students examine research-based curriculum and inquiry teaching and learning as best practices in science education. Prerequisites: Education 100, 102, 104 Co-requisites: 317, 426 and 426F.

3
EDU432 Human Georgraphy

The course provides a review of the interaction between diversity of culture and the impact of geography. Economics, government, social structure, and cultural diversity are all reviewed as they developed over time and in the context of the contemporary world.

3

*(This course is required for Social Studies Certification)

+ Visual Arts K-12 Certification

Note: courses are not necessarily taken in numerical order.

Art History courses:

ART131 History of World Art I: Prehistory to 1400

This introductory survey focuses on art of the ancient world and the Middle Ages in the West and selected non-Western cultures to 1400 including India, China, and Mesoamerica. It emphasizes the role of art in the formation of a culture, the shifting function of art in different societies and time periods, and the approaches students can use to understand art.

3
ART132 History of World Art II: 1400 to Present

This introductory survey focuses on Western art from the Renaissance to today and the art of selected non-Western cultures (including Japan, Africa, and Islamic countries) after 1400. It concentrates on the stylistic, technical, and expressive evolution of painting, architecture, and sculpture within specific historical contexts, yet also explores the cross-influences and interaction of non-Western and Western art as defining characteristics of the modern world.

3

A 2 course Art history concentration

Studio Courses:

ART105 Sculpture I

This beginning course explores the basic concepts, materials, and techniques of sculpture, including carving, casting, and construction. Conceptual and critical approaches are introduced in their relation to specific projects. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART111 Ceramics I

This studio course provides students with an introduction to ceramic processes and materials. Instruction in beginning wheel-throwing methods augments competency in basic construction and surface application techniques. Projects focus on development of form and surface in ceramics, as well as exposure to historical and contemporary issues specific to the medium. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART115 Painting I

This course introduces the student to basic principles of painting and two-dimensional thinking and expression. Drawing skills, color theory, stretcher construction, and a general understanding of visual art concepts accompany each assignment. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART117 Drawing I

Through various drawing media, this studio course explores the basic principles of creating a work of visual art, including figure studies from the model, studies from nature, and techniques of composition. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART127 Printmaking I

This course is an introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of graphic media, including dry point, engraving, mezzotint, etching, and aquatint. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART135 2-D Design I

This course is an introduction to the problems and use of two-dimensional design. Subjects include pattern, balance, scale, movement, rhythm, proportion, and relationships of figure to ground in various media. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART124 3-D Design I

This course introduces the student to the basic elements of 3-D design. Through slide lectures, field trips, and a sequence of problem-solving exercises in conjunction with basic shop skills in a variety of materials, students explore such areas as furniture and interior, sculptural, and architectural design. Basic computer applications areintroduced. Additional Fee(s): Applied art fee.

3
ART141 Media Literacy

This course introduces students to teh Macintosh computer interface and related media practices. Students explore digital foundations, media related histories, theoretical frameworks and critical examination of production elements as they discover how computers are radically changing the way image makers create and present their work. Cross listed as COM 141. Additional Fee(s): Course Computing Fee.

3
ART498 Tutorial: Art

4
ART499 Tutorial: Art

4
PHI276 Art, Beauty, Truth

A philosophical inquiry into the nature and significance of art, beauty, and aesthetic experience, interpretation, and evaluation. Prerequisite(s): One course in philosophy.

3

Three additional courses in advanced studio work

One photography course

Education Courses:

EDU104 Perspectives on Education

Students examine the role of teachers and schools in past and contemporary society. Selected educational issues are analyzed including role of technology in the classroom, legal issues for teachers, school-community relations, and current legislative initiatives. A 16 hour field placement is embedded in this course. Additional Fee(s): Field Placement Fee

3
EDC105 Child Development: Birth through grade 4

This course addresses physical, social, cognitivie, and moral development from prenatal stages through middle chlidhood. Students examine child development in teh context of social, cultural, instructional settings. Using case studies, the implications of growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning is achieved. Students learn to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive and challengin for all children.

3
EDU205 Classroom Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners

This course explores how effective language development results in children who successfully learn to read and can use reading effectively in academic subject areas and to negotiate the world. A major focus of this course is on information and methods for enhancing the literacy and academic experiences of students in grades K-12 classified as English as second language (ELL) students.

3
EDU219W Cognitive Learning Theories

This course addresses brain and cognitive development from prenatal stages through middle childhood. Students examine child development in the context of learning theories. The implications of physical and social growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning are explored. A field experience where theories and concepts can be observed is part of this course and serves to inform classroom discussion and activities.

3
EDU234 Inclusion: Issues and Strategies

This course provides the conceptual framework for understanding inclusion issues in our public schools. The students discuss the variety of exceptionalities found in public school settings and the resultant impact of inclusion policy upon instructional practice. A field placement is embedded in this course. Prerequisite(s): EDU 100, 102, 103, 104 and 208. Additional Fee: Field Placement Fee.

3
EDU400 Data Driven Instruction Decisions

The importance of making decisions based on actual data collected on students now plays a major role in all schools. The data that needs to be reviewed goes beyond standardized test results and needs to include both summative and formative assessment results. The connection between the curriculum and the assessments utilized to assess a student’s progress along the curriculum needs to be viewed as a guide to effective educational decision making. Students entering the educational profession need a background in types of assessments and how data collected from such assessments can meet the needs of students in the context of the curriculum.

2
EDU409 Differentiated Reading and Writing

This course provides the regular and special education teacher with specific data-based knowledge and skills to teach reading and writing to students with disabilities. Strategies to develop conceptual understanding in the content areas are equally important for the beginning and more accomplished learner. Projects include developing lessons that differentiate instructional practive and assessment to help all students achieve.

3
EDU431 Assessment and Adaptation

Students investigate the assessment of indiciduals with mild to moderate disabilities. Topics include the fundamental principles of assessment tools and the social reponsibility of professionals to exercise fairness and accuracy in the assessment process.

3
EDU437 Methods of Teaching Elementary Art

Students approach the teaching of art consistent with national standards of pedagogy and art. This course combines theory, research and practical knowledge about teaching art as a universal language and creative experience to elementary school children. This course contains an embedded field experience of 16 hours in an elementary art classroom. Additional Fee: Field Placement Fee

3
EDU447 Methods of Teaching Secondary Art

Students approach the teaching of art consistent with national standards of pedagogy and art. This course combines theory, research and practical knowledge about teaching art as a universal language and creative experience to secondary students. STudents work with host classroom teachers at two different schools or two different levels (middle and high school). Corequisite: EDU415.

3
EDU430 Diverse Family and Community Partnerships

Advocates, educators, and parents have called for more and better family-school partnerships for decades. Recently, a body of empirical evidence has indicated that partnerships can have a positive impact. A number of studies highlight the positive associations between parent involvement in schools and their children's social and emotional development and academic achievement. This course explores the form and focus of several types of partnership.

3
EDU423 Student Teaching

9

+ Environmental K-12 Certification

Science Concentration

The environmental science concentration provides students with an understanding of human impact on ecosystems and methods of improving environmental health and quality as well as analytical tools for scientific measurement.

Environmental Science content courses (required for the B.A. and B.S. degrees)

Biology (4 courses):

BIO143 The Cell

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of current biological concepts, including cell structure, function, division, and basic genetics. Biologically important molecules also are presented. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class

3
BIO143L Lab: The Cell

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO143. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO143. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
BIO144 The Organism

This course provides a general survey of animals and plants at the organismic level, with emphasis on their evolution and various physiological processes such as respiration, circulation, digestion, and reproduction. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class.

3
BIO144L Lab: The Organism

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO144. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO144. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

1

Science (1 course):

IND350 Scientific Research Methods

This course serves as an introduction to research literature and research methodology in the sciences. Students prepare a research proposal including literature review, experimental design and methods, budget, timetable, and bibliography. Other topics include professional presentation techniques and research ethics. The student's major department must approve proposals prior to the Tutorial. Prerequisite(s): Junior status and completion of at least two courses at the 200-level or above in the major, or permission of the instructor.

2

Chemistry (4 courses):

CHM107 Chemistry I

This class begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM108 Chemistry II

The second semester of general chemistry continues exploring the structure, properties, and bonding of atoms and molecules, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): CHM 105 or 107; Corequisite: CHM 110.

3
CHM109 Chemistry I Laboratory

Introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with the lectures in Chemistry 105 and Chemistry 107. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: CHM 105 or 107. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
CHM110 Chemistry II Laboratory

Continued introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with lectures in Chemistry 108. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: CHM 108. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1

Math (1 course):

MTH110 Elementary Statistics

Topics include statistical measures and distributions, decision making under uncertainty, application of probability to statistical inference, linear correlation, introduction to nonparametric statistical methods, and application to problems drawn from the natural and social sciences. Three hours of class per week. Three hours of class per week.

3

Environmental (3 courses):

ENV147 Environmental Geology

Fundamental earth science concepts are used to assess the impact of increasing global population and development on the Earth’s natural resources as well as to examine how natural processes interact with human activities. Aspects of environmental geology that are particularly applicable to western Pennsylvania are emphasized. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

4
ENV498 Tutorial: Environmental Studies

4
ENV499 Tutorial: Environmental Studies

4

Electives for B.A. and B.S.: Environmental Group (1 course):

ENV116 Global Environmental Challenges

This course explores the global implications of environmental issues. It is designed for all students interested in our global environment, one of the most critical issues of our time. The basic premise is that global ecological systems are in decline. This course will not only introduce students to the major issues causing or relating to this ecological decline, but also provide a template for thinking about and acting on solutions. Therefore, the focus is on active, participation-based learning, and students should leave the course ready to create environmental change.

3
ENV129 Our Fragile Earth: A Scientific Perspective

This course introduces students to a wide range of environmental issues from a scientific perspective. Specific topics vary from year to year, but this course utilizes lectures, discussions, laboratories, guest speakers and field trips to increase knowledge about environmental problems as well as increase scientific knowledge and literacy.

3
ENV317 Environmental Solutions and Systems

This course takes an interdisciplinary, solution-oriented approach to the analysis of diverse environmental issues. Students learn systems thinking and sustainability as methods to evaluate and act upon environmental problems. Three hour lectures per week. Prerequisite(s): ENV 116 or 129

3

Elective for B.S.: Science Group (1 course):

BIO216 Aquatic Biology

Basic ecology of a variety of freshwater ecosystems is examined, including energy flow, nutrient cycling, physical and chemical parameters, flora, and fauna. The management, maintenance, preservation, and pollution of aquatic systems are considered. Laboratory sessions include laboratory work and field trips. Three hours of class and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 143 and 144; CHM 109 and 110; or permission of the instructor. Additonal Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

3
BIO216L Lab: Aquatic Biology

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO216. Laboratory sessions include laboratory work and field trips. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO216. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

2
BIO226 Toxicology

An introduction to toxic substances, their classification, entry into living systems, modes of action, and fate. Various living systems are considered, from the subcellular to the ecosystem level. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO143 and 144, and CHM 109 and 110

3
ENV443 Environmental Chemistry

This course is an advanced study of the chemical principles underlying common environmental problems. It aims to deepen the student’s knowledge of chemistry and its role in the environment and to show the power of chemistry as a tool to help us comprehend the changing world around us. Cross-listed CHM 443. Prerequisite: A 300-level ENV course or permission of the instructor.

4

Additional Electives for B.S.:

Two courses in BIO, CHM, PHY, or MTH. Recommended courses:

BIO248 Ecology

A study of the interrelation between organisms and their environment. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 143 and 144.

3
BIO248L Lab: Ecology

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO248. Four hours of laboratory or field experience per week. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO248. Additional Fee (s): Laboratory fee.

2
BIO316 Evolution

This course introduces the student to the principles and forces that produce biological evolution. students will also examine the development of evolutionary theory through a historical perspective. Scientific thinking and communication are emphasized with example in the vertebrate classes. Prerequisite: BIO143 and BIO144, Junior or Senior standing

3

Education Courses:

EDU104 Perspectives on Education

Students examine the role of teachers and schools in past and contemporary society. Selected educational issues are analyzed including role of technology in the classroom, legal issues for teachers, school-community relations, and current legislative initiatives. A 16 hour field placement is embedded in this course. Additional Fee(s): Field Placement Fee

3
EDU105 Child Development: Birth Through Grade 4

This course addresses physical, social, cognitivie, and moral development from prenatal stages through middle chlidhood. Students examine child development in teh context of social, cultural, instructional settings. Using case studies, the implications of growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning is achieved. Students learn to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive and challengin for all children.

3
EDU205 Classroom Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners

This course explores how effective language development results in children who successfully learn to read and can use reading effectively in academic subject areas and to negotiate the world. A major focus of this course is on information and methods for enhancing the literacy and academic experiences of students in grades K-12 classified as English as second language (ELL) students.

3
EDU219W Cognitive Learning Theories

This course addresses brain and cognitive development from prenatal stages through middle childhood. Students examine child development in the context of learning theories. The implications of physical and social growth and development on instructional planning for effective learning are explored. A field experience where theories and concepts can be observed is part of this course and serves to inform classroom discussion and activities.

3
EDU234 Inclusion: Issues and Strategies

This course provides the conceptual framework for understanding inclusion issues in our public schools. The students discuss the variety of exceptionalities found in public school settings and the resultant impact of inclusion policy upon instructional practice. A field placement is embedded in this course. Prerequisite(s): EDU 100, 102, 103, 104 and 208. Additional Fee: Field Placement Fee.

3
EDU336 Methods of Teaching Elementary Science

This course presents concepts, processes, and skills essential to the elementary school science program. The standards set by the National Science Teachers Association serve as a framework for the course. Inquiry teaching and learning are experienced through research-based national programs.

3
EDU400 Data Driven Instruction Decisions

The importance of making decisions based on actual data collected on students now plays a major role in all schools. The data that needs to be reviewed goes beyond standardized test results and needs to include both summative and formative assessment results. The connection between the curriculum and the assessments utilized to assess a student’s progress along the curriculum needs to be viewed as a guide to effective educational decision making. Students entering the educational profession need a background in types of assessments and how data collected from such assessments can meet the needs of students in the context of the curriculum.

2
EDU409 Differentiated Reading and Writing

This course provides the regular and special education teacher with specific data-based knowledge and skills to teach reading and writing to students with disabilities. Strategies to develop conceptual understanding in the content areas are equally important for the beginning and more accomplished learner. Projects include developing lessons that differentiate instructional practive and assessment to help all students achieve.

3
EDU415 Secondary School Curriculum

Students investigate instructional planning and implementation as well as a range of behavior and classroom management techniques. Reading assignments in appropriate professional literature encourage students to develop a familiarity with the most effective teaching approaches. Motivation, evaluation of student achievement, and differentiation of instruction are considered. Prerequisites: EDU100, 102, and 104

3
EDU418 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science

Examination of current theory and practice for teaching science in secondary schools is explored in this course. Curriculum development, teaching strategies and methodologies, and assessment issues are also addressed. Students examine research-based curriculum and inquiry teaching and learning as best practices in science education. Prerequisites: Education 100, 102, 104 Co-requisites: 317, 426 and 426F.

3
EDU430 Diverse Family and Community Partnerships

Advocates, educators, and parents have called for more and better family-school partnerships for decades. Recently, a body of empirical evidence has indicated that partnerships can have a positive impact. A number of studies highlight the positive associations between parent involvement in schools and their children's social and emotional development and academic achievement. This course explores the form and focus of several types of partnership.

3
EDU431 Assessment and Adaptation

Students investigate the assessment of indiciduals with mild to moderate disabilities. Topics include the fundamental principles of assessment tools and the social reponsibility of professionals to exercise fairness and accuracy in the assessment process.

3
EDU423 Student Teaching

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Additional courses for certification

Literature requirement – Choose 1 of the following:

ENG447 Contemporary Environmental Fiction

A study of environmental fiction ranging from Jack London’s The Call of the Wild to Margaret Atwood’s Surfacing and Jane Smiley’s A Thousand Acres, this course attends in specific to the representation of nature and environment in 20th-Century novels and other cultural texts (e.g., Bambi or The Emerald Forest). Students will consider how such representations interrogate, critique, or reinforce contemporary constructions of the environment. Special attention will be given to questions of history, gender, and "what counts" (e.g., urban versus wilderness) as the environment. Prerequisite(s): 200-level English course or permission of department chairperson.

3
ENG443 Nature and Culture

This course explores the issues of ecology and identity as part of the development of American literary culture. The development of an ecological imperative and the patterns of "nature" consciousness will be explored as they rise, grow and change. Questions of the relationship between nature and culture will be the main focus of the course, including the developing ideology of ecology as a response to the growth of mechanical culture and the rapid loss of wilderness. Cross-listed as ENV 445.

3
ENG452 Ecofeminist Literature

This course brings together theoretical, nonfictional, and fictional approaches to the study of women and the environment. Students will examine how diverse ecofeminist writers problematize, resituate, and reclaim the woman/nature paradigm--a construct historically based in patriarchal culture. This course focuses particularly on how representations of women and environment (ranging from the traditional to the radical) can help students rethink and reimagine their relationship to the Earth. Cross-listed as ENV 452.

3
ENG419 Frontier Women

An impressive number of narratives, novels, diaries, and poems recording the responses of women to the American frontier have become available in recent years. By reading about these frontier experiences, and examining differences in perception and conception based apparently on gender, students will better understand how the frontier functioned within American culture and what "cultural work" these texts accomplished.

3