Chatham University

Exercise Science Curriculum

Major Requirements
22 courses, including:
BIO 143
The Cell
3 Credits
This course is designed to provide a broad overview of current biological concepts, including cell structure, function, division, and basic genetics. Biologically important molecules also are presented. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class and two hours of laboratory per week.

Additonal Fee(s): Laboratory fee.
BIO 144
The Organism
3 Credits
This course provides a general survey of animals and plants at the organismic level, with emphasis on their evolution and various physiological processes such as respiration, circulation, digestion, and reproduction. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class and two hours of laboratory per week.

Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.
BIO 201
Anatomy
3 Credits
Lectures emphasize the human body and clinical applications of anatomy. They focus on anatomical terminology, gross structures, body movements, forming a three-dimensional mental image of body parts, and functional understanding of normal structures. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 143 and 144
BIO 202
Physiology
3 Credits
This course introduces students to the basic concepts of physiology. The lectures will emphasize chemical principles, cellular biological principles, and a survey of the nervous, endocrine, immune, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, excretory, respiratory, and digestive systems. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite(s): BIO 201
CHM 107
Chemistry I
3 Credits
This course begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week.

Prerequisite(s): Co-requisite: CHM 109
CHM 109
Chemistry I Laboratory
1 Credits
Introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with the lectures in Chemistry 105 and Chemistry 107. Three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisite(s): Co-requisite: CHM 105 or 107.

Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.
EXS 101
Introduction to Exercise Science
1 Credits
This course is designed to provide an overview of the field of exercise science as a discipline and profession. Students will be exposed to methods and techniques employed to develop positive attitudes and habits that support an active lifestyle. Topics of health risk factors and wellness will be explored as they specifically relate to exercise. Possible career choices related to this field will also be discussed.
EXS 102
First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
1 Credits
A 1-credit lab/lecture discussion course in which American Red Cross techniques of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer, and Community First Aid & Safety are presented. In addition to these skills, current methods of management and treatment of emergency illnesses and injuries are also taught. All students who meet the American Red Cross standards will receive American Red Cross Certification.
EXS 252
Exercise and Nutrition
3 Credits
This course introduces the student to the science of human nutrition and the relationship between health, exercise and food intake. Basic topics of digestion, absorption, metabolism, interaction and functions of nutrients will be covered. Special topics emphasized in this course include optimal nutrition for exercise and sport, energy use during exercise, evaluation of body composition (body fat, muscle mass), development of obesity, weight management, and nutritional factors in planning a successful muscular strength and endurance program.
EXS 345
Kinesiology and Movement Science
4 Credits
This course serves as an introduction to kinesiology and movement science of the human body. The student will learn the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the major joints of the human body and the application of kinesiology and biomechanical principles to describe and analyze normal and pathological human movement. Principles and practical application of motor learning, motor control and skill acquisition will also be introduced. Lab will include activities related to skill acquisition, performance and biomechanical analysis of functional motor patterns.
EXS 325
Applied Exercise Physiology I
4 Credits
This course provides students with the knowledge of theoretical and applied aspects of exercise physiology with an emphasis on exercise response and exercise testing. An in-depth understanding of how the body responds when exposed to acute bouts of exercise will be provided through lectures and laboratories. Topics discussed will include physiological adaptations of the cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, and neuromuscular systems in response to exercise, and assessment of aerobic endurance, muscular fitness and body composition.
EXS 426
Applied Exercise Physiology II
3 Credits
This course provides students with the knowledge of theoretical and applied aspects of exercise physiology and wellness. The emphasis of this course focuses on the physiological adaptations to exercise training. Students will learn how to design exercise prescriptions for typical adult populations, athletic populations, and special populations (i.e. pediatric, geriatric, obese).
EXS 498
Tutorial
4 Credits
No description available.
EXS 499
Tutorial
4 Credits
No description available.
IND 350
Scientific Research Methods
2 Credits
No description available.
MTH 108
Precalculus
3 Credits
Development of essential skills in algebra and trigonometry. Topics include the coordinate system, functions and their graphs, solutions of equations and inequalities, introduction to transcendental functions, trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, and the historical and cultural significance of mathematics. Three hours of class per week.

Prerequisite(s): One year of high school algebra or equivalent.
MTH 151
Calculus I
4 Credits
This is the first course in the calculus sequence. Topics include differential and integral calculus for algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications. Three hours of class per week.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 105 and 106, or MTH 108, or equivalent.
MTH 110
Elementary Statistics
3 Credits
Topics include statistical measures and distributions, decision making under uncertainty, application of probability to statistical inference, linear correlation, introduction to nonparametric statistical methods, and application to problems drawn from the natural and social sciences. Three hours of class per week.

Prerequisite(s): Two years of college-preparatory mathematics.
PHY 251
Principles of Physics I
4 Credits
Introduction to the concepts, laws, and structure of physics. This is the first course in a calculus-based sequence that focuses on classical mechanics. Topics include vector analysis, kinematics, Newton’s laws, work, conservation of energy and momentum, collisions, gravity, harmonic motion, and wave phenomena. Four hours of class per week.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MTH 151.
PHY 255
Physics Laboratory I
1 Credits
Experimental techniques of classical mechanical physics. Three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisite(s): PHY 251

Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.
PSY 101
General Psychology
3 Credits
An introduction to the scientific study of behavior with an emphasis on the origins of behavior, learning, social influences, physiological factors, individual differences, personality, and adjustment and maladjustment.
PSY 152
Human Growth and Development
3 Credits
Physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development are studied throughout the life span. Major theories of development are discussed. Applications and examples are presented from applied contexts. Special needs of individuals at various stages throughout the life span are addressed. This course is not a substitute for 200- and 300-level developmental courses that apply toward majors in psychology and social work and certification in education. Does not count toward the psychology major.
Students intending to apply to physical therapy graduate school are advised to take the following courses in addition to the above curriculum: CHM 108/110 Chemistry II and Lab (4); PHY 252/256 Physics II and Lab (5).