Chatham University

History Curriculum

The history program offers courses in American, European, and non-Western history. These courses provide students with a grounding in the many ways historians have made sense of the world. Understanding how diverse societies, economies, states, and cultures have changed and developed over time is crucial to evaluating and adapting to today‘s ever-changing world. Throughout their course work, students learn to acquire, organize, analyze, and clearly communicate information - in other words, to think critically and write well.

The teacher certification program offers certification in secondary social studies teaching. Students interested in this program should see the Certification Coordinator in the Education program for specific requirements.

Program Requirements

+ Major Requirements

12 courses, including:
HIS100 Introduction to World History

This course is an introduction to world history from the rise of civilization to the present. It establishes and compares major themes in the leading civilizations of today’s world. It investigates the development of the modern world system and interpretations of its impact on these civilizations.

3
HIS102 Introduction to American History

This course examines significant areas in the development of American society from the Colonial period to the present. It focuses particularly on the issues of gender, class, race, religion, politics, and ideology to provide students with the grounding in those areas crucial to understanding today's society.

3
POL311 Selected Topics in Social Science Research

The course introduces methods and approaches used to describe, explain, and evaluate social science research. Students will get an introduction to an instructor chosen research topic. Students will learn to formulate questions, create a literature review, gather and evaluate evidence and provide feedback on outside research concerning the selected course topic. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

3
HIS498 Tutorial: History

4
HIS499 Tutorial: History

4
One of the following:
HIS201 Introduction to the Modern Middle East

This course introduces students to the cultural, religious, social, economic and political landscape of the Middle East. It provides an in-depth look at 'traditional' society, state and culture and then highlights change and resistance to change in the period since the First World War, when European imperialism redrew the political map and westernization threatened to redraw social, cultural and religious maps.

3

1 approved 3-credit internship

2 300 or 400-level seminars

3 courses concentrating in European, American or non-Western history from the following:

HIS215 Ind & the Working Class in Europe & America

This course seeks to understand who built America, under what conditions they labored, and to understand their hopes, dreams, and stuggles to create a better future for themselves and their families. The couse traces the historical development of the American working class from colonial times to the present. Particular attention is given to the formation of working class political and economic orgaizations and their impact on American history.

3
HIS213 Special Topics

3
HIS224 The Holocaust: Nazis, Occupied Europe, The Jews

This course surveys the destruction of two-thirds of European Jewry during World War II. Through a close reading of primary texts and secondary sources, it explores the foundations and development of Nazi policy toward the Jews. The course documents the reactions of Jews, European peoples and governments, the U.S. people and government, and various churches and political movements.

3
HIS231 History of the British Empire

History of the British Empire examines the historical narratives relating to imperialism, ethnocentrism, military aggressions, colonization, acculturation, repression of revolt, technological diffsuion, intellectual outreach, and cross-cultural fertilization from the beginning of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I in 1558 to the return of Hong Kong to China in 1997.

3
HIS241 History of Islam

This course is a historical examination of classical Islamic civilization: its origins, nature, and development. Special attention is given to the religion of Islam and the contributions of Arabs, Persians, and Turks to Islamic civilization. Cross-listed as REL 241.

3
HIS301 The Middle East and the United States

This course examines the history of the modern Middle East and how U.S. foreign policy has shaped that history from 1945 to the present. It explores official U.S. policy toward the Middle East and the policies of Middle Eastern countries toward the United States, but also tries to understand U.S.-Middle East relations in cultural, economic, and social terms. Prerequisite(s):(s): Any 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

3
HIS302 The Global Cold War

This course examines the Cold War from a global perspective. It balances its analysis of the actions of various nation-states with analysis of the impact of the Cold War on ordinary people. It pays special attention to 233 diplomatic and military actions, social and cultural changes, evolving global trade patterns, popular uprisings, and revolutions. Prerequisite(s):(s): Any 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

3
REL275 History of Christianity

The History of Christianity will provide students with a broad historical overview of Christianity from its founding to its relevance in contemporary society. It will expose students to the primary sacred and historical texts of Christianity and will attempt to foster an authentic understanding of this religion tradition.

3
HIS283 Religious Movements in Contemporary Africa

This is an interdisciplinary exploration of religious experimentation and innovation in modern African history. The course focuses on enterprises that intensify the production and reinvention of sacred ceremonies, legendary narratives, social norms, ritualistic language, and forms of political participation.

3
HIS285 African-American History

This course examines the history of African Americans within a global context from the 1500s through present. The course explores the role of West Africa in the Atlantic economy and slave trade; the nature of slavery in the US as compared to Latin America; emancipation in the US and Latin America; industrialization and migration; and the civil rights movement in its international context.

3
HIS400 Colonial Latin America

While Intro to Latin American History places its emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth century’s, this course focuses entirely on the colonial period from European discovery through the independence movements of the mid-nineteenth century. It pays particular attention to indigenous cultures and societies; the conquest of native states; the development of plantations and the forced labor; European efforts to evangelize among native populations; the role of race in colonial society; the role of caudillos in the colonial economy; and the emergence of liberalism. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level history course or permission of the instructor

3
HIS401 History of Pan-Africanism

This course examines the birth and development of the ideology that promoted a universal approach to the rehabilitation of the philosophical traditions, need for self-respect, political consciousness, and aspirations for transatlantic unity among Black people between the 1770s to the end of the 20TH century. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

3
HIS402 Gender and the Family in America

In every era the family has served as a basic human institution, but it has always been subject to other forces in society, such as religion, politics, and the economy. This course traces the history of the American family from the antebellum period to the twentieth century. It examines changes in relationships within the family (parents/children, husbands/wives) and the changing role of the family in society. Particular attention will be paid to the role of the family in defining gender roles and the effects of other institutions upon the family. Prerequisite(s): Any 200-level history course or permission of the instructor.

3
HIS426 The Arab-Israeli Conflict

This course examines the origins and issues of conflict between the Arabs and Israelis over Palestine. Using extensive primary materials and some secondary sources, the arguments of all sides of the conflict are presented and evaluated. While the core conflict between Palestinians and Israelis is emphasized, the role of regional and world powers also is examined. Prerequisite(s): HIS 242 or permission of the instructor.

3
1 program elective

+ Interdisciplinary Major Requirements

8 courses, including:
HIS100 Introduction to World History

This course is an introduction to world history from the rise of civilization to the present. It establishes and compares major themes in the leading civilizations of today’s world. It investigates the development of the modern world system and interpretations of its impact on these civilizations.

3
HIS102 Introduction to American History

This course examines significant areas in the development of American society from the Colonial period to the present. It focuses particularly on the issues of gender, class, race, religion, politics, and ideology to provide students with the grounding in those areas crucial to understanding today's society.

3
One of the following:

0
HIS201 Introduction to the Modern Middle East

This course introduces students to the cultural, religious, social, economic and political landscape of the Middle East. It provides an in-depth look at 'traditional' society, state and culture and then highlights change and resistance to change in the period since the First World War, when European imperialism redrew the political map and westernization threatened to redraw social, cultural and religious maps.

3

0

0

1 approved 3-credit internship

2 courses concentrating in American, European or non-Western history

1 300- 400-level seminar

2 program electives

+ Minor Requirements

6 courses, including:

2 courses from the following:

HIS100 Introduction to World History

This course is an introduction to world history from the rise of civilization to the present. It establishes and compares major themes in the leading civilizations of today’s world. It investigates the development of the modern world system and interpretations of its impact on these civilizations.

3
HIS102 Introduction to American History

This course examines significant areas in the development of American society from the Colonial period to the present. It focuses particularly on the issues of gender, class, race, religion, politics, and ideology to provide students with the grounding in those areas crucial to understanding today's society.

3

0
HIS201 Introduction to the Modern Middle East

This course introduces students to the cultural, religious, social, economic and political landscape of the Middle East. It provides an in-depth look at 'traditional' society, state and culture and then highlights change and resistance to change in the period since the First World War, when European imperialism redrew the political map and westernization threatened to redraw social, cultural and religious maps.

3

0

0

1 200- or 300-level course each in American, European and non-Western history

1 300-400-level seminar