Chatham University

Botany Curriculum

Botany, or plant biology, is the scientific study of plants, from algae to giant sequoia trees. A minor in botany is ideal for students who wish to supplement their studies in some other discipline with a concentrated study of plant life.

Program Requirements

+Core Requirements

(5 required courses - 15 credit hours) - required in all three concentrations:

COM525 Communications Research and Theory

Course provides an overview of the major theoretical and research developments in the communications discipline. The emphasis will be on the application of theory to practice and on applied research. Topics include quantitative and qualitative research methods, research ethics, and the history of development of communication theories.

3
COM528 Risk and Crisis Communications

Students acquire an understanding of crisis management and risk communication. Course topics include public opinion research, data collection and analysis, crisis and risk management theory, and communication tactics and strategies. Students develop case studies relating to their areas of professional interest.

3
COM625 Communications Campaigns

Students explore the use of communication campaigns to reduce health risks and promote public health and awareness. Course prepares students to develop, implement, and assess health campaigns. Drawing on health behavior theory and communication research and theory, students work on case studies and develop original campaigns employing multiple commuication channels.

3
COM680 Integrative Project

3
COM685 Communications Project

This is the capstone project for all students in the Master's in Communications program. This applied learning experience bulids upon previous coursework. Students develop a major project designed to meet their professional interests. The project will demonstrate mastery of the knowledge and skills gained throughout the program.

3

+Environmental Communication

9 credits

COM515 Environmental Communications

Course offers an overview of environmental communications providing an analysis of how individuals, institutions and corporations describe and portray our interactions with the environment. Discussion topics include environmental discourse, environmental conflicts, risk communication, environmental disasters, environmental social movements, and the nature-society relationship.

3
SUS504 Introduction to Sustainability and Systems

This course provides students the skills to understand, communicate, and critique the fundamentals of sustainability at multiple scales and across disciplines and cultures. It explores sustainability's origins and foundations, application, and assessment. We evaluate the inter-relationships among environmental, societal, and economic well-being and the implications on individual and social decision-making.

3
SUS580 Sustainable Behavior Change

This hybrid course combines classroom and online instruction with real-world application. Students learn the latest science concerning sources of environmental degradation. In teams, students apply motivational theory, collect secondary and primary data, and develop an action plan for increasing pro-environmental behaviors (PEB) in a specific context.

3

+Health Communication

9 credits

COM510 Health Communications

Course provides an introduction to the essential concepts and theories of health communication. Students study how individuals understand health issues and how communication processes help shape and influcence our acceptance of health-related messages. Topics include health literacy, media coverage of health issues, and health risk communications.

3
BUS511 Health Policy & Advocacy

Analyze and synthesize innovative approaches to issues in health care delivery at all levels. Politics, policy, market forces, and advocacy are used to assess how system approaches affect health care delivery. Transformational leadership for political and policy activism are emphasized, while exploring regional, national, and global health issues and trends. licy activism are emphasized, while exploring emerging regional, national, and global health issues and trends.

3
BUS540 Leadership for Change in Healthcare Organizations

Focuses on the needs of health care leaders to take health care delivery into the future through innovative initiatives. Includes: variables impacting health care delivery systems; reimbursement and funding for design change; managing competition; creating the health care delivery system of the future; and managing human and financial resources.

3

+Strategic Communication

9 credits

COM550 Organizational Communications

Course covers current theory and research in the area of organizational communications. Includes formal and informal organizations and public and private organizations. Topics include organizational culture, employee information needs, decision making, leadership and power. Emphasis will be placed on developing the analytical tools to analyze and improve organizational communications.

3
COM518 Strategic Communications

Course provides an overview of concepts, tactics and skills employed in strategic internal and external communications. Students learn how to determine the communications objective(s), define the target audience(s) and stakeholders, and develop key messages to improve strategic communications.

3
COM610 Media and Social Change

Course focus is on the relationship between media and social change. It examines the way various entities have employed mass media, the Internet, mobile media, and social networks to prompt social change. Topics include social marketing, persuation and influence, community engagement, strategic philanthropy, and corporate social responsibility.

3

+Electives

6 credits

All students will round out their program of study with 6 credits of electives.

+Minor Requirements

22 credits, including:
BIO143 The Cell

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of current biological concepts, including cell structure, function, division, and basic genetics. Biologically important molecules also are presented. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class

3
BIO143L Lab: The Cell

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO143. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO143. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
BIO144 The Organism

This course provides a general survey of animals and plants at the organismic level, with emphasis on their evolution and various physiological processes such as respiration, circulation, digestion, and reproduction. This course is a prerequisite for all upper-level biology courses. Three hours of class.

3
BIO144L Lab: The Organism

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO144. Two hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO144. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

1
BIO224 Botany

An introduction to the structure and function of plants. Topics include the evolutionary rise of green plants, plant life cycles and development, plant physiology, plant ecology, and the morphology and taxonomy of vascular plants. The importance of plants fro humans is discussed, including their use for food and medicine. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 143 and 144.

3
BIO484 Plant Physiology

This course is an introduction to the physiology and biochemistry of plants. Lectures and laboratory exercises cover plant cells, enzymes, transport of water and nutrients, metabolism, defenses against pathogens, gene expression, hormones, and responses to environmental stimuli. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 143 and 144, and CHM 109 and 110.

3
CHM105 General Chemistry

This class covers the same material as Chemistry 107 below, but is specifically structured for students who have had little or no previous chemistry experience, or who need extra help with algebraic problem solving. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM107 Chemistry I

This class begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM108 Chemistry II

The second semester of general chemistry continues exploring the structure, properties, and bonding of atoms and molecules, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): CHM 105 or 107; Corequisite: CHM 110.

3
CHM109 Chemistry I Laboratory

Introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with the lectures in Chemistry 105 and Chemistry 107. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: CHM 105 or 107. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
CHM110 Chemistry II Laboratory

Continued introduction to the basic experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in chemistry. Experiments are correlated with lectures in Chemistry 108. Three hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite: CHM 108. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
Courses listed here that are also required for a student’s major must be replaced by a course approved in advance by the department chair.