Chatham University

Chatham News

YWCA CEO visits campus on April 9 to discuss Innovative Entrepreneurship for a Nonprofit

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
March 25, 2010

Click here to read more about Magdeline Jensen and the YWCA in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

PITTSBURGH (March 25, 2010) … The Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University continues its monthly Women Business Leaders Breakfast Series with Magdeline Jensen, CEO of the YWCA Greater Pittsburgh, discussing “Innovative Entrepreneurship for a Nonprofit” on Friday, April 9, 2010, at 7:30-9:30 a.m. The $25 admission fee includes a continental breakfast and networking session which precede the presentation. Registration and information is available at www.chatham.edu/cwe or by calling 412-365-1253.

Ms. Jensen’s presentation will discuss the YWCA Greater Pittsburgh entrepreneurship venture to open a Nathan’s Famous food franchise in a portion of its building storefront downtown as a way to develop new, alternative income streams. She will answer questions on the reasoning behind the choice of Nathan’s Famous, and the overall process in assessing capacity, the market, and projected profit. She will also address other important issues such as Nathan’s Famous having an impact on the YWCA non-profit status, and how the YWCA will be able to protect it.

Ms. Jensen has been the CEO of the YWCA Greater Pittsburgh since November 2007. The YWCA is a non-profit association whose mission is to eliminate racism and empower women and girls. Founded in 1869, the Association operates 12 programs and five annual events, all of which are managed by more than 200 employees working at four locations throughout Allegheny County. Prior to her position at the YWCA, Ms. Jensen was the first woman to be selected as the Chief Federal Probation Officer in Arizona, where she managed a $15 million operation of the U.S. Probation office for nine years. She holds a Bachelor of Arts, Criminology and a Master of Criminology from the University of California, Berkeley, CA.

About CWE
The mission of the Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University is to educate, create economic opportunities, and foster entrepreneurial thinking for women entrepreneurs, women in business, and students. The Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University (CWE) provides opportunities for women entrepreneurs in both new development and growth stages of their businesses to start, develop and significantly grow their companies by utilizing Chatham resources, programs, faculty expertise, and student assistance. CWE also provides programming targeted to local and regional women in business. This programming is designed to teach women in business how to think and act entrepreneurially by focusing on innovation and creativity within the context of an existing organizational environment. And finally, CWE offers specific programs for both undergraduate and graduate students which help them learn the skills needed to become either successful entrepreneurs or successful women in business. For more information about programs offered by CWE call 412-365-1253 or visit www.chatham.edu/cwe

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Department of Business and Entrepreneurship presents a culinary delight with Philadelphia’s Master Chef Joseph Poon

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
March 22, 2010

PITTSBURGH (March 22, 2010) … Fans of Asian fusion cuisine will not want to miss the opportunity to meet and learn from Master Chef Joseph Poon from Philadelphia’s Chinatown, who will be giving a presentation at Chatham University in Shadyside on Tuesday, March 30. For more information contact Anne Flynn Schlicht, Assistant Director at Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at aschlicht@chatham.edu or 412-365-1153.

Chef Poon will be discussing his business and entrepreneurial venture and share his insights about the food industry. Chef Poon will finish the class with a demonstration of his Sculpture carving of fruits and vegetables. The presentation is from 6:30-8:30 p.m. in Woodland 103 classroom on Chatham University campus. Event is Free, but registration is required by clicking here.

Master Chef Joseph Poon is known for his Asian Fusion Cuisine. He prepares fresh meals with simple elegance — and a dash of adventure. From his contemporary and quirky venue in Philadelphia Chinatown, conducts Wok ‘N Walk Tours of Philadelphia Chinatown and teaches cooking classes. He recently published the inspirational, autobiographical cookbook, “Life is Short…Cooking is Fun.” His warmth and exuberance have earned him appearances on “The Tonight Show” with Jay Leno, “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” and TV Food Network’s “The Best of…”

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Chatham’s nursing degree partner, UPMC Shadyside earns national recognition for nursing excellence

By: Susan Manko, UPMC
March 22, 2010

PITTSBURGH (March 22, 2010) … UPMC Shadyside has earned Magnet designation for excellence in nursing by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®. Only 6 percent of hospitals nationwide have been granted Magnet status, one of the highest achievements an organization can obtain in professional nursing. UPMC St. Margaret achieved Magnet status in 2009.

“Magnet status recognizes excellence in nursing. It also further demonstrates the teamwork and commitment of our entire hospital staff who work daily to provide the highest quality care possible for our patients,” said Sandy Rader, R.N., chief nursing officer and vice president of patient care services, UPMC Shadyside. “This achievement is reflective of the whole organization. We are very proud of UPMC Shadyside for achieving this difficult-to-obtain designation. It is an example of UPMC’s mission to improve lives in western Pennsylvania by providing excellence in patient care and promoting a healthy work culture.”

Magnet candidates must undergo a rigorous and lengthy application and evaluation process that includes extensive interviews and review of all aspects of nursing services. To earn Magnet status, hospitals must clearly demonstrate a commitment to excellence on all levels of nursing practice and adhere to national standards for organization and delivery of nursing services. Magnet hospitals are recognized for building and supporting a continuous culture of transformational leadership, structural empowerment, exemplary evidence-based practice, advanced training, new knowledge application and innovations with measurable outcomes proving quality patient care. The designation is valid for four years, during which time the ANCC monitors the hospital to ensure that high patient care standards remain intact. The ANCC is the largest and most prominent nursing credentialing organization in the United States.

About UPMC Shadyside
UPMC Shadyside is a 517-bed tertiary care hospital that has been serving the residents of Pittsburgh and the tri-state area since 1866. UPMC Shadyside offers primary medical care; physician and nursing education; and a broad range of specialties that include cardiology, oncology, orthopaedics, geriatrics, gynecology, vascular medicine, endocrinology and more.

About UPMC
UPMC is an $8 billion integrated global health enterprise headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and is one of the leading nonprofit health systems in the United States. As western Pennsylvania’s largest employer, with 50,000 employees, UPMC is transforming the economy of the region into one based on medicine, research and technology. By integrating 20 hospitals, 400 doctors’ offices and outpatient sites, long-term care facilities and a major health insurance services division, and in collaboration with its academic partner, the University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences, UPMC has advanced the quality and efficiency of health care and developed internationally renowned programs in transplantation, cancer, neurosurgery, psychiatry, orthopaedics and sports medicine, among others. UPMC is commercializing its medical and technological expertise by nurturing new companies, developing strategic business relationships with some of the world’s leading multinational corporations, and expanding into international markets, including Italy, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Cyprus, Qatar and Japan. For more information about UPMC, visit our Web site at www.upmc.com.

Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education receives the Benjamin Franklin Medal for Distinguished Achievement on behalf of higher education

By:
March 22, 2010

Hershey, PA (March 22, 2010) … The Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education (PCHE) is the 2010 recipient of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Pennsylvania’s (AICUP) Benjamin Franklin Medal for Distinguished Achievement on Behalf of Higher Education. The award will be presented on Monday, March 22, 2010 in Hershey during the Association’s Annual Meeting of its 87 member college and university presidents. The Benjamin Franklin Medal, named for one of our nation’s and Pennsylvania’s earliest and most recognized leaders, is reserved for individuals who have made an extraordinary contribution to the ongoing vitality and effectiveness of Pennsylvania’s colleges and universities.

The AICUP Board of Directors this year broke with the tradition of presenting the award to an elected official, instead recognizing the critical work of a group of college and university leaders who resolved a potentially explosive proposal from Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl to impose a one percent tuition tax on students. With the national press watching and with implications for students attending all post-secondary institutions of higher education, the PCHE presidents were united and worked closely together to find an appropriate resolution to this unacceptable proposal. After weeks of public hearings, student rallies and negotiations, the PCHE presidents, Mayor Ravenstahl and members of City Council managed to arrive at a satisfactory conclusion that did not impose a first-in-the-nation tuition tax on students. Mayor Ravenstahl instead has invited representatives of PCHE to work with him to find a long-term solution to the structural fiscal problems confronting the City of Pittsburgh.

While AICUP is composed of private college and university presidents, the Association’s Board recognized that the tuition tax proposal would harm students attending all sectors of higher education—including community colleges, public universities, theological seminaries, and for-profit trade schools as well as private colleges and universities. The Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education (PCHE) is comprised of the following institutions (all located in Allegheny County): Carlow University, Carnegie Mellon University, Chatham University, Community College of Allegheny County, Duquesne University, La Roche College, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, Point Park University, Robert Morris University, and the University of Pittsburgh.

According to AICUP President Don Francis, “The ability of the presidents in the Pittsburgh Council on Higher Education to resolve successfully the Pittsburgh tuition tax proposal was as important as any accomplishment in Pennsylvania higher education in the last decade.”

About AICUP
The Association of Independent Colleges & Universities of Pennsylvania (AICUP), the only statewide organization that serves exclusively the interests of private higher education within the Commonwealth, exists to complement and support the work of campus leaders. With a membership of 87 private colleges and universities within Pennsylvania, the Association provides a variety of services and programs tailored specifically to the needs and situation of independent higher education. A list of AICUP’s member colleges and universities is included on its website at www.aicup.org.

Master of Interior Architecture program receives initial accreditation from Council for Interior Design Accreditation

By: Paul A. Kovach, Vice President for Public and Community Relations
March 17, 2010

PITTSBURGH (March 17, 2010) … The Master of Interior Architecture (MIA) program at Chatham University has received its initial six-year accreditation from the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), according to an announcement by Laura Armesto, Ph.D., vice president for academic affairs.

Chatham’s Master of Interior Architecture is a first professional interior design program that prepares students for practice in an interior design or architecture firm. The only program of its kind in Pittsburgh, the two-year MIA stresses a holistic design approach. Students are encouraged to consider all factors that influence the design of interior spaces and to accept a sustainable approach to interior design that makes “green design” a minimal standard and not a trend. The curriculum focuses on the design of residential and commercial spaces – how space is organized, developed three-dimensionally, finished with materials and color, lit, furnished, and designed to incorporate user needs and building codes. More information is available at www.chatham.edu/mia.

“Program Director Lori Anthony and our faculty and students are to be commended for receiving their initial accreditation,” Dr. Armesto said. “This was an engaging process for a distinctive program that successfully integrates Chatham’s environmental mission throughout its curriculum.”

Professional level programs accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation voluntarily place themselves before the scrutiny of the profession to ensure that students receive an education that will serve them not only during their time at school, but also prepare them for future professional growth. Students enrolled in an accredited interior design program can be confident that the program meets the quality standards recognized by the profession.

About CIDA
The Council for Interior Design Accreditation is an independent, non-profit accrediting organization for interior design education programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. For more than 35 years this knowledge-driven organization has been passionately committed to the ongoing enrichment of the interior design profession through identifying, developing and promoting quality standards for the education of entry-level interior designers, and then encouraging, accrediting and supporting educational programs to aspire to those standards.

The Council for Interior Design Accreditation is recognized as a reliable authority on interior design education by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Student-curated exhibit of West African art opens March 18 at Chatham University Art Gallery

By: Paul A. Kovach, Vice President for Public and Community Relations
March 17, 2010

PITTSBURGH (March 17, 2010) … In celebration of its Global Focus Year of West Africa, Chatham University undergraduate students selected artifacts from the University’s extensive Olkes Collection of African Art to curate Mother, Maker, Model: Women in West African Art at the Chatham University Art Gallery from March 18-April 8, 2010. The opening reception will be Thursday, March 18 from 4:00-6:00 p.m.

The Chatham University Art Gallery, located in Woodland Hall on the Quad, is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and on weekends by appointment. For gallery information call 412-365-1106. Directions and campus parking locations are available at www.chatham.edu/campusmap.

The works in the exhibition were selected, researched, and installed by the students of ART 378: Curating the Visual Arts, part of Chatham’s Art Museum Studies minor program, directed by Dr. Elisabeth Roark, Associate Professor of Art. The Olkes Collection at Chatham University includes over 600 works of African art given to the University in 2001 by Dr. Cheryl Olkes, class of 1970. Dr. Olkes lived among the Songhay culture of Niger in the late 1970s and early 1980s. An avid collector and great admirer of African culture, she intended her gift to act as a study collection for Chatham students and as a vehicle for developing clearer perceptions of Africa’s artistic heritage.

“Since this is Chatham’s 140th anniversary year as one of the oldest undergraduate women’s colleges in the U.S., and also our Global Focus Year of Africa, I thought it would be important for the students to utilize the breadth and depth of the Olkes Collection to explore the roles women play in these West African nations,” Dr. Roark said.

“In many West African countries women hold special places in religion, ritual, social control, and politics, and are a predominant subject of artists who create works of art that function in these realms. “For example, images of women in West African art range from the large scale Gelede Society masks of the Yoruba, which honor the wisdom and power of post-menopausal women, to functional items carved with female figures, such as slingshots by the Baule.”

The Chatham minor in Art Museum Studies is the only university program of its kind in Pittsburgh. Dr. Roark began the semester-long class discussing the job description and theoretical and practical realities of a curator – a role, she says, that is often little understood, if at all, by the general public. “The word itself is derived from the Latin “to care” or “caretaker.” Depending upon the size of an organization and its collection, a curator’s role could include a variety of tasks including acquisition, installation, research and education, and could serve as a generalist or specialist,” she says. The students also examined the theory of curating African works, which are often displayed from a historical, cultural or thematic context.

Dr. Roark assigned the students to seven genres, and the students then selected works based upon that particular theme, designed the installations and drafted the works’ labels. Students were responsible for researching each theme and art object to help place it in context for the viewer. The genres included:

The Ideal Woman – Curated by Katherine “Keight” Rafferty, Minneapolis, Minn. and Melissa Conte, Bethlehem, Pa.
Women of Power – Curated by Alexandra “Lexi” Ribar, Waynesburg, Pa.
Motherhood and Fertility – Curated by Sarah Renninger, Farmington, Pa. and Lisa Maness, Moon Township, Pa.
Men as Women – Curated by Leanne Horgan, Pittsburgh
Women and Worship – Curated by Rachael Moynihan, Martins Ferry, Ohio
Women and Transitions – Curated by Hannah Debo, New Brighton, Pa.
Women and Functional Objects – Curated by Elizabeth “Lizz” Wilkinson, Chelsea, Mich.

“Some African cultures are matriarchal, and so the role of the woman as mother and caregiver is emphasized,” Dr. Roark explains. “In some of these cultures, men will often don headdresses and costumes that represent women, while in others women will hold places of power.”

This is the fourth exhibition of artifacts from the Olkes Collection curated by Chatham undergraduates. Dr. Roark sees the collection as both a significant body of work and a tool for students to learn about art and African culture.

“What’s exciting about this exhibition is that my students can see how other cultures – including those that some consider ‘primitive’ – elevate women to a higher degree than men,” Dr. Roark says. “As these students learn what it means to become an adult woman in modern society, they also learn to challenge their own perceptions of womanhood.”

About the Global Focus Program
Chatham’s Global Focus program engages students in the purposeful study of peoples and civilizations. The University’s community of scholars promotes the acquisition of sustainable global competencies through the critical and holistic exploration of one specific country or region of the globe every year.

About Chatham
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Chatham earns national diversity award for its All Faith Worship Service

By:
March 17, 2010

BOSTON (March 17, 2010) – Diversity has long been an integral part of many events at NACA’s National Convention, and during the Association’s 50th Anniversary celebration in February 2010, diversity awards were presented to individuals and campus programs within the Association that have moved NACA’s diversity initiatives forward through various activities and programs.

One of those awards, the 2010 NACA Outstanding Diversity Achievement Campus Program Award, was presented to Chatham University for its “All Faith Worship Service.”

NACA is a membership-based association that links the higher education and entertainment communities in a business and learning partnership, creating educational and business opportunities for students and professional members.

The NACA Outstanding Diversity Achievement Campus Program Award is presented to an institution for a program that fosters meaningful relationships between diverse student groups, challenges stereotypical perceptions of diverse populations, helps students learn to communicate effectively with people of varied backgrounds and generates awareness and appreciation of diverse cultures.

In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on the role of Higher Education to provide opportunities for students to embrace spiritual needs. Chatham’s weekly, student-led service is a time for all students, faculty and community members of all faiths to come together to worship. The service, initiated in 2009, provides opportunities for spiritual reflection and meditation for all participants of varying faiths.

The All Faith Worship Service community embraces the diversity of religious and spiritual beliefs, and this assists students in having an increased understanding, tolerance, and respect for all global religions. For many Chatham students, the All Faith Worship Service has provided an outlet to develop and mature their own spiritual beliefs in addition to learn about the beliefs and traditions of other faiths besides their own.

The All Faith Worship Service is a collaborative effort between Student Affairs, Academic Affairs and the Interfaith Council. The service has been led by a multitude of individuals from these different areas that spend their Sunday evenings with Chatham’s new All Faith Worship Service community. In the beginning, the service was primarily run by different religious presiders, faculty, staff, and student leaders; at this point, the service has become student led.

The NACA National Convention is an annual gathering of more than 2,500 event bookers and campus activities professionals from NACA member colleges and universities who come together to network, book talent, receive training and develop the services that they are able to offer the student body at their home colleges and universities. NACA marks 50 years of advancing campus activities in higher education in 2010.

Other diversity-related activities taking place during the Convention included:
• HBCU Connections, a program designed to introduce delegates from Historically Black Colleges and Universities to programs, services and resources available to them through NACA, while also allowing them to network with other delegates;
• Diversity Mix & Mingle – LGBTQIA, a social networking event designed specifically for delegates who affiliate themselves with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/transsexual, questioning, intersex and ally interests;
• Educational exhibits built around the theme “Everyone is Cultural” to share information about the history of NACA diversity initiatives; and
• Coffee and Conversations Exchange, a morning opportunity for interested delegates to exchange ideas about diversity issues over morning coffee.

NACA’s entertainment showcases have always featured ethnically diverse artists performing in equally diverse genres, ranges from hip-hop and jazz to country music and comedy. A special entertainment component of the Convention is the NBC Universal Stand-Up for Diversity showcase, which features seven comedians from various ethnic and racial backgrounds. All were selected through the annual Stand-Up for Diversity Talent Search and will tour the U.S. throughout 2010.

Since 1960, the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) has evolved into the nation’s largest collegiate organization for campus activities. Its membership is composed of 1,000 member colleges and universities nationwide, and more than 800 associate members doing business in the college market. Associate members include talent agencies and performers representing more than 8,800 artists and specialty product items.

For more information, contact Jason Darby at jasond@naca.org, or visit www.naca.org.

Chatham welcomes Woodrow Wilson Fellow Julius Coles to campus March 15-17; campus reception planned for March 16 at 5:00 p.m.

By: Paul A. Kovach, Vice President for Public and Community Relations
March 14, 2010

(March 14, 2010) … As part of its Global Focus Year of Africa, the Chatham University community welcomes Professor Julius Coles, President Emeritus of Africare and Director of Global Education and Andrew Young Center for International Affairs. Professor Coles is the University’s Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow, sponsored by the Council of Independent Colleges (CIC).

During his visit from March 15-17, Professor Coles will meet with Chatham University faculty, including Fulbright Scholar Professor Tompson Makahamadze, as well as students. He will also participate in several Global Focus Year of Africa events on campus, and also tour the University’s Olkes Collection of African Art, the largest of its kind in western Pennsylvania. A special reception will be held for Professor Coles on Tuesday, March 16 at 5:00 p.m. in the Mellon Board Room. For more information contact the Office of the Dean of Chatham College for Women at 412-365-2467 or freed@chatham.edu

Chatham’s Global Focus program engages students in the purposeful study of peoples and civilizations. The University’s community of scholars promotes the acquisition of sustainable global competencies through the critical and holistic exploration of one specific country or region of the globe every year.

About Professor Julius Coles
Julius E. Coles has been Africare’s president since mid-June 2002. An Africare supporter since the organization’s beginning, Professor Coles served as a Board member from 1997 until assuming the presidency. Africare is committed to being the premier Africa-focused non-governmental organization (NGO) working in partnership with African people to build sustainable, healthy and productive lives and communities, and to be a leading voice addressing African development and policy issues.

From 1997 to 2002, he was the director of Morehouse College’s Andrew Young Center for International Affairs. He served as the director of Howard University’s Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center from 1994 to 1997.

Most of Professor Coles’s previous career, spanning some 28 years, was as a senior official with the United States Agency for International Development. He was mission director in Swaziland and Senegal and served in Vietnam, Morocco, Liberia, Nepal and Washington, D.C. Professor Coles retired from the U.S. government’s foreign service in 1994 with the rank of career minister. His foreign service-related awards include the Distinguished Career Service Award (1995) and the Presidential Meritorious Service Award (annually, 1983-1986).

Professor Coles’ numerous other awards have included Princeton University’s James Madison Medal (2007), Morehouse College’s National Alumnus of the Year (2006) and the Amistad Achievement Award (2003). He was decorated by then President Abdou Diouf of Senegal as Commander in the Order of Lion (1994).

Professor Coles is a member of the Boards of InterAction, the Alliance Française (Washington, D.C.), the Andrew Young Center for International Affairs at Morehouse College, Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and the Society for International Development. In addition, he is a member of the Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, the Rotary Club of Atlanta, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Bretton Woods Committee and the UNESCO International Commission on the Gorée (Senegal) Memorial.

He received his B.A. from Morehouse College (1964) and his master’s degree in public affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs (1966). He also has studied at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, the U.S. Department of State Foreign Institute’s Senior Seminar, the Federal Executive Institute and Institut de Français in Paris.

Born in Atlanta, Ga., Professor Coles is the father of two grown daughters and lives with his wife, Jean in Vienna, Va.

About Chatham
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Local Food Showcase on March 11 moves to Anderson Dining Hall

By: Paul A. Kovach, Vice President for Public and Community Relations
March 2, 2010

(March 2, 2010) … Because of overwhelming interest by the region’s food producers and purveyors, the first annual Local Food Showcase: A Grower / Buyer Event will be moved to the Anderson Dining Hall in Mellon Center on Chatham University’s Shadyside Campus. Sponsored by Chatham University’s new Master of Arts in Food Studies program, Penn State Extension – Allegheny County, and Parkhurst Food Service, the event will be held on March 11, 2010 from 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Designed as a tradeshow to foster networking among producers and purveyors, the event will also be open to the general public for $5.00 admission. Visitor parking will be available in the University’s Library/Theatre Lot accessible via Murray Hill Avenue. For more information contact Heather Mikulas at 412-473-2540 or hem12@psu.edu. For directions and parking information visit www.chatham.edu/campusmap.

The current list of vendors includes:

American Health Group (Farm to Table)
Backyard Gardens
Chatham University Master of Arts in Food Studies
Cherry Valley Organics
Clarion River Organics
Curran and Taylor
Dillner Family Farms
East End Food Coop
Enrico Biscotti
European Desserts
Frankferd Farms
Friendship Farms
Grow Pittsburgh
Harvest Valley Farms
Herbal Delights
Hillspring Farms
Jamison’s Farms
Kretchmann Farms
Latimer Valley Organics
Le Ara Farms, LLC, Wilson Family Farms
Logan Family Farms
McElhaney Family Farm
Milestone Specialty Produce
Najat’s Cuisine
Parkhurst Food Service
PASA
Penn’s Corner Farm Alliance
Schramm’s Farm
Six Penn
Standing Chimney Breads
Studio 4 Cooking
Sturges Orchard
The Purple Spoon Jams
Turner Dairy
yumpittsburgh.com

About Chatham’s Master of Arts in Food Studies
The Master of Arts in Food Studies is one of the few graduate food studies programs in the U.S and the only one to offer both sustainable agriculture and culinary arts and cuisine within a liberal arts environment. The Master of Arts in Food Studies at Chatham University is unique in its emphasis on a holistic approach to food systems, from agriculture and food production to cuisines and consumption, providing intellectual and practical experience from field to table.

Graduates gain analytical and experiential knowledge of global and local food systems. Academic courses provide a critical framework, emphasizing the ways people relate to food within a cultural and historical context. Food Studies is the interdisciplinary domain that includes agricultural and culinary history as well as sociological, cultural, political, economic, and geographic examinations of food production and consumption. Students will study how food, from farm to table to compost, shapes people and the global environment. The curriculum connects real world problems with ethics, theory, history, communication, research skills, and experiential knowledge, offering concentrations in food politics, history and culture, and food markets and marketing.