Chatham University

Chatham News

Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship hits a hole-in-one with new Business on the Links workshop – read the recap in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
June 28, 2010

Click here to read Joyce Gannon’s workshop review in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

PITTSBURGH (June 28, 2010) … Golf and business still mix well, but the rules and etiquette of the game can confuse or intimidate even the most established entrepreneur. That’s why the Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University and BizChicks are presenting “Business on the Links,” a golf workshop for business women on Tuesday July 13, 2010 from 12:00-1:30 p.m. at Chatham University’s Shadyside Campus.

Registration is $20 and includes lunch. For more information and to register visit www.chatham.edu/cwe or call 412-365-1253.

Moderating the event will be Sandy Thomas, personal business golf coach and retired LPGA pro. The seminar is designed for players of all levels and will help participants build the skills and confidence to play golf and do business at the same time. Players are encouraged to bring their 7-iron and putter for evaluation. Topics covered during the seminar include:

• Golf rules & terms, etiquette, scoring and course management.
• Equipment evaluation: clubs & golf balls.
• How to practice with purpose and efficiency.
• How to play faster – helpful skills and playing hints.
• The advantages of developing business through golf.
• When are you ready for business golf?
• How to contribute in a corporate scramble event without intimidation.
• 13 things you can learn about a client from a round of golf.
• Opportunities to learn the game – how and where to get instruction.
• The 19th hole and beyond!

About the Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship
The Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University (CWE) provides opportunities for women entrepreneurs in both new development and growth stages of their businesses to start, develop and significantly grow their companies by utilizing Chatham resources, programs, faculty expertise and student assistance. CWE also provides programming targeted to local and regional women in business, to advance and hone their skills, by teaching them to think and act entrepreneurially by focusing on innovation and creativity within the context of an existing organizational environment. And finally, CWE has specific programs for both undergraduate and graduate students which can help them learn the skills needed to become either a successful entrepreneur or a successful woman in business. Initial funding for The Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University was provided for in part through grants from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation and the Lois Tack Thompson Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation.

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to help develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

About BizChicks
BizChicks is a recently formed organization, on its way to becoming a total women’s resource center, providing education, guidance and resources in a number of different areas, including business planning, coaching, health & wellness. BizChicks is nonprofit organization forming the nexus of networking and growth for professional women, and is a growing rapidly over 500 strong. One of the BizChicks programs is Chicks & Chat networking events, a forum for bringing together women who are business professionals in the for profit and not for profit arenas, as well as the educational and artistic community. It is quite the diverse group in terms of profession as well as age, with attendees ranging in age from mid to late twenties to mid-seventies. In 2009, BizChicks launched a new networking forum designed to showcase BizChicks’ members during a power hour lunch called BizChicks LunchMix, in which selected female owned or managed businesses would utilize the hour to showcase their business.

Fatherhood can be important to the mental health and well-being of the family, according to Chatham University professor

By: Paul A. Kovach, Vice President for Public and Community Relations
June 15, 2010

Click here to read Dr. Isacco’s First Person essay on fatherhood in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

PITTSBURGH (June 15, 2010) … According to researchers, the role of the father in family relationships is critical, and more research into fatherhood has intensified over the last decade. Even on Father’s Day in 2009 President Barack Obama noted that “Of all the rocks upon which we build our lives, we are reminded today that family is the most important. And we are called to recognize and honor how critical every father is to that foundation. They are teachers and coaches. They are mentors and role models. They are examples of success and the men who constantly push us toward it.” Two recent studies by Anthony Isacco, Ph.D., assistant professor of counseling psychology at Chatham University, examine the role of fathers in postpartum mental health and in family healthcare decisions.

“Urban Father’s Role in Maternal Postpartum Mental Health,” published in the fall 2009 journal Fathering (Men’s Studies Press) and authored with Craig F. Garfield, MD, MAPP, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and NorthShore University HealthSystem, examined 31 urban fathers through qualitative interviews to determine how fathers play a role in both identifying maternal depression and providing support. Twenty-three percent of fathers were able to describe mood or behavioral changes in the mother, which corresponded with DSM-IV depressive symptoms. Not only did fathers identify changes in the mother, fathers offered a variety of support to the mother. In particular, fathers in this study considered their consistent presence during this time, sometimes just by “being there,” of great comfort and support to mothers.

“Greater research has shown the new and varied roles that fathers play in the family,” Dr. Isacco says, “and one of those roles could be in helping physicians who care for families and children identify changes in maternal mental health. Mothers will often hide signs of depression and anxiety from friends, relatives and doctors, and so if they are sharing this information with fathers, the role of the father in helping mothers through post-partum depression could then be critical.”

In the second study, “Child Healthcare Decision-Making: Examining “Conjointness” in Paternal Identities Among Residential and Non-Residential Fathers,” also co-authored by Dr. Garfield and published in the winter 2010 issue of Fathering, the authors defined “conjointness” as how the father identifies himself as a co-parent and how the mother impacts a man’s self-views and self-meanings as a father. Garfield and Isacco surveyed 31 residential and non-residential fathers in urban settings and found two new paternal identities they described as “self-as-detached identity” and “mixed identity.” In the former, fathers would often be less involved in medical decisions for the child, often replying when asked, “I don’t know, the mother handled the decision.” In the latter, the fathers fluctuated between co-parental and independent identities. Responses were greatly influenced by the residential status of the father.

“We found fathers who lived with the mother might not necessarily have had a greater role in medical decisions for the child but had greater trust in the mother to make the decision, and felt less disenfranchised than the non-residential fathers,” Dr. Isacco said. “Unfortunately, non-residential fathers face several contextual and personal barriers to being more co-parental with the mother in healthcare decisions. Barriers such as lack of custody, relationship dissolution with the child’s mother, divorce, and lack of knowledge of healthcare details and lack of confidence in their decision-making were clearly present for non-residential fathers.” “During the prenatal period medical providers and hospital personnel can greatly help fathers learn to have a greater role in their child’s healthcare, which would not only benefit the child but help to strengthen the relationship between mother and father.”

About Anthony Isacco
Anthony Isacco III is assistant professor of counseling psychology and joins Chatham from the University of Oregon. His publications and presentations focus on fatherhood, men’s health and masculinity, social justice, and diverse populations. A recipient of The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship, Anthony earned a bachelor of psychology and philosophy from Franciscan University (Steubenville, Ohio); a master of counseling psychology from Boston College; and a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Loyola University.

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to help develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.