Chatham University

Chatham News

Recap the mid-term election on Nov. 3 with some of Pittsburgh’s political experts

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
October 27, 2010

PITTSBURGH (October 27, 2010) … With this year’s mid-term election promising to be a nail-biter until the last returns come in, the morning-after analysis will be just as intriguing. That’s why the Pennsylvania Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy at Chatham University will present “The Morning-After Breakdown” on Wednesday, November 3, an analysis and discussion of the local and state-wide results, as well as the national implications for the Senate and House of Representatives. The Morning-After Breakdown, which is free and open to the public, will be held in Mellon Hall on the University’s Shadyside Campus and begin at 8:30 a.m. with a continental breakfast followed by the panel discussion from 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Moderated by Dana Brown, the Center’s director, the panel will include:
• Jackie Filla, Ph.D., Chatham University assistant professor of political science
• Heather S. Heidelbaugh, election law specialist
• Tony Norman, columnist, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Online registration is available at www.chatham.edu/events. For more information contact the PCWPPP at 412-365-1878 or asteckel@chatham.edu

The Pennsylvania Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy was originally established in 1998 as the Center for Women in Politics in Pennsylvania through the generosity of The Hillman Foundation, Inc. and the Maurice Falk Medical Foundation. The Center provides programming on contemporary policy issues, promote political awareness, develop leadership skills for college and community women, encourage the development of networks, link curricular and co-curricular activities for students, and foster the application of knowledge to politics and policy.

Celebrate the Chopin and Schumann dual bicentennial with members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
October 26, 2010

PITTSBURGH (October 26, 2010) … In celebration of the dual bicentennial celebration of the births of composers Frederic Chopin and Robert Schumann, the Chatham University Music Department will present a specialChamber Music at Chatham on Monday, November 1, 2010 from 7:00 – 8:00 p.m. in the James Laughlin Music Hall.

This special presentation will feature Anne Martindale Williams, principal cello of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra; and David Wehr, piano performing Chopin’s and Schumann’s masterpieces, including Chopin’s Sonata in G minor for Cello and Piano, op.65.

Admission at the door is $15 (free for Chatham faculty/staff/students). For more information contact Pauline Rovkah at 412-365-1679 or rovkah@chatham.edu.

Women’s rights advocate Lisa Maatz set to appear on campus Tuesday, October 12

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
October 7, 2010

PITTSBURGH (October 7, 2010) … The Chatham University Pennsylvania Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy and the National Council of Jewish Women-Pittsburgh Section will present An Evening with Lisa Maatzon Tuesday, October 12 in the University’s Campbell Memorial Chapel. A passionate advocate for women’s rights, Ms. Maatz will present “Advocating for Women’s Economic Independence: Is Washington Listening?” This event includes a reception from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. and lecture and Q&A from 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Admission is $25. For more information contact the Pennsylvania Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy at 412-365-1878 or email asteckel@chatham.edu. Click here to purchase tickets online.

“This is a critical election with much at stake for women,” said Ms. Maatz. “I’m so pleased to be working with our partners at NCJW and Chatham University’s PA Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy to have this important conversation. I expect a lively evening.”

Lisa Maatz has served as the Director of Public Policy and Government Relations at the American Association of University Women since 2003. During that time, she also spent 16 months serving concurrently as the Interim Director of the AAUW Legal Advocacy Fund. Since1881, AAUW has been the nation’s leading voice promoting equity and education for all women and girls.

As AAUW’s top policy adviser, Maatz works to advance AAUW’s priority issues on Capitol Hill, through the executive branch, and in coalition with other organizations. Maatz is a sought-after speaker across the nation and on Capitol Hill, and provides leadership to several coalitions working to advance opportunities for women and girls. Recently featured in the book, Secrets of Powerful Women, Maatz has developed a reputation for her strategic approach to legislation and advocacy. She has done similar work for the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund and the Older Women’s League, and was a legislative aide to U.S. Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (D-NY). Her grassroots advocacy career began when she was the Executive Director of Turning Point, a battered women’s program recognized for excellence by the Ohio Supreme Court.

Maatz is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Ohio University, has two Master’s degrees from Ohio State, and holds an adjunct appointment with the Women and Politics Institute at American University. Honors include a Congressional Fellowship from the Women’s Research & Education Institute, and a mayoral appointment to the Washington, DC Commission on Women. Maatz has also been honored by the Women’s Information Network’s Young Woman of Achievement Award (she serves on that organization’s Advisory Council) and the Mentor Award from the Public Leadership Education Network. To add to her many achievements, this year Maatz received the Karen Mulhauser Award, given annually to the WIN Advisory Council member who has gone above and beyond in contributions to the organization. Lisa is being honored for her tireless efforts in promoting equity and education for all women and girls, both as a professional as well as a volunteer, including mentoring numerous WIN members.

About the Pennsylvania Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy
The Pennsylvania Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy (PCWPPP) is a non-partisan center devoted to fostering women’s public leadership through education, empowerment, and action. The first to focus on women’s political involvement in Pennsylvania, the Center integrates disciplinary knowledge, civic education, and capacity building while examining the intersection of women and public policy. The Center conducts candidate and advocacy trainings, offers educational programs in applied politics, and provides timely analysis on women’s issues.

About the National Council of Jewish Women
The National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW) is a grassroots organization of volunteers and advocates who turn progressive ideals into action. Inspired by Jewish values, NCJW strives for social justice by improving the quality of life for women, children and families and by safeguarding individual rights and freedoms.

About Chatham University 
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Bridges to Other Worlds: Imagining Nature features Edward Abbey biographer, Jim Cahalan

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
October 4, 2010

PITTSBURGH (October 4, 2010) … With a focus on the environment and sustainability, Chatham University’s nationally-recognized Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program will present Bridges to Other Worlds: Imagining Nature at Chatham’s Shadyside campus on Saturday, October 23 from 10:00 a.m.-6:30 p.m. at the University’s Shadyside Campus. Guest speakers this year include Todd Davis (poet); Ian Marshall (scholar); Kate Miles (nonfiction); BK Loren (nonfiction); and Jim Cahalan (Edward Abbey biographer).

Bridges to Other Worlds will feature panel presentations, small group discussions and readings about the place-based writing and the influence of western Pennsylvania’s diverse environments on literature. The event is free and open to the public. More information is available by emailing sstgermain@chatham.edu or calling 412-661-1809.

Schedule of Events
10:00- 11:45 a.m.: Concurrent Sessions with small groups of students (various locations)

Mellon Board Room:
12:00- 1:30 p.m.: Lunch with Jim Cahalan. “Ed Abbey in Appalachian Western Pennsylvania and the Desert Southwest: Imagining a Life in the Natural World; or, How to Stir up Trouble and Inspire Millions”
2:00-3:30 p.m.: Keynote Panel-Imagining Nature with Jim Cahalan, Todd Davis, BK Loren, Ian Marshall, Kate Miles. Sheryl St. Germain, Moderator
3:45-5:15 p.m.: Reading-Todd Davis, BK Loren, Ian Marshall and Kate Miles
5:15-6:30 p.m.: Reception and Book Signing

Guest Authors
James M. Cahalan’s
 ‘My People’: Edward Abbey’s Appalachian Roots in Indiana County, Pennsylvania won the 1996 Solon J. Buck Award for Western Pennsylvanian History, as the best article of the year in Pittsburgh History, from the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania. His biography Edward Abbey: A Life received the 2002 Thomas J. Lyon Award in Western American Literary and Cultural Studies, from the Western Literature Association. A professor of English at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, he was awarded IUP’s 1990 Distinguished Faculty Award for Research.

Todd Davis, winner of the Gwendolyn Brooks Poetry Prize, teaches creative writing, environmental studies, and American literature at Penn State University’s Altoona College. He is the author of three books of poetry, The Least of These, Some Heave and Ripe. In addition to his creative work, Davis is the author or editor of six scholarly books, including Kurt Vonnegut’s Crusade, or How a Postmodern Harlequin Preached a New Kind of Humanismand Mapping the Ethical Turn: A Reader in Ethics, Culture, and Literary Theory.

BK Loren’s fiction and nonfiction have garnered many national awards including the Mary Roberts-Rinehart National Nonfiction Fellowship, an Atlantic Arts Fellowship, and a Ucross Fellowship. Her first book, The Way of the River, was published to shining reviews. Her shorter works have appeared in numerous periodicals and anthologies, including Orion Magazine, Parabola, Berkeley Fiction Review, Yoga International, and The Best American Spiritual Writing of 2004.

Ian Marshall, professor of English and Environmental Studies at Penn State Altoona, is a past president of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment. Working in the field of “ecocriticism,” or literary scholarship informed by ecological awareness, he is the author of Story Line: Exploring the Literature of the Appalachian TrailPeak Experiences: Walking Meditations on Literature, Nature, and Need and Walden by Haiku. He has also co-edited a collection of scholarly essays, Coming into Contact: Essays in Ecocritical Theory and Practice.

Kathryn Miles is an award-winning writer whose recent essays have appeared in Ecotone, Editor Unleashed, Connotations, Terrain, The Bioregional Imagination, PMLA, and Best American Essays. She is the author of Adventures With Ari and the long-running “Backcountry Bistro” column. Miles currently serves as director of the Environmental Writing program at Unity College, as editor of Hawk & Handsaw: The Journal of Creative Sustainability.

About the MFA in Creative Writing
Chatham’s MFA in Creative Writing allows students to focus on tracks in creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, screenwriting, and writing for children, and encourages them to explore two tracks simultaneously. Students take innovative field seminars that include travel to such places as Costa Rica, Ecuador, India and Germany. In 2007 Poets & Writers named the MFA one of “Nine Distinctive Programs” and The Atlantic Monthly named it one of five Innovative/Unique Programs in the country in its “Best of the Best” graduate program listings, while in 2009 The Writer named it one of ten programs that offer a specialty focus. Chatham University also offers an undergraduate BFA in Creative Writing, an online Master of Professional Writing, and a low-residency Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. For more information visit www.chatham.edu/mfa.

About Chatham University 
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Master of Physician Assistant Studies program receives over $2 million in federal grants for education and scholarship

By: Paul A. Kovach, Vice President for Public and Community Relations
October 1, 2010

PITTSBURGH (October 1, 2010) … The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration announced this week that Chatham University’s Master of Physician Assistant Studies (MPAS) program was awarded approximately $2 million in grants through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Chatham’s MPAS program will receive $ 1,113,542 in funding for physician assistant training through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 and $880,000 for scholarships over five years under the Expansion of Physician Assistant Training (EPAT).

This June Chatham’s MPAS program also received from HRSA a one-year $110,872 grant to fund scholarships for disadvantaged students, $44,102 of which was ARRA funded, bringing the program’s 2010 fundraising total thus far to over $2.1 million.

Chatham’s awards are part of $130 million in HHS grants to support primary care workforce training ($42.1 mil), equipment to enhance primary care workforce training ($50.5 mil.), oral health workforce training ($23.9 mil), loan repayments for health professionals ($8.3 mil), health careers opportunity program ($2.1 mil), and patient navigator outreach and chronic disease prevention in health disparity populations ($3.8 mil).

“We are very proud of our MPAS program and I congratulate Luis Ramos, our program director, as well as our faculty and staff for receiving this grant,” noted Laura S. Armesto, Ph.D., vice president for academic affairs. “The MPAS is one of Chatham’s most exemplary graduate programs and this funding will help to both enhance the academic component and provide needed tuition assistance to our students.”

“Physician assistants fill an important role in today’s medical community, whether in a busy doctor’s office or an underserved rural community that lacks basic care,” explained Mr. Ramos, MS, PA-C. “These grants will not only benefit our program and students, but also the millions of Americans that need quality health care.”

About Chatham’s MPAS Program
The Master of Physician Assistant Studies (MPAS) program at Chatham University provides academic and clinical training that prepares graduates to be certified and licensed to practice as extenders to the practicing physician, especially the primary care physician. Established in 1995, Chatham’s MPAS is a recognized leader in PA education and was the first in the United States to introduce Problem-Based Learning (PBL) as the primary methodology in post-graduate PA education. PBL utilizes self-directed learning, rather than classroom lectures, to prepare Physician Assistants with competency to practice as primary care providers. Self-directed learning enables students to rely on evidence-based medical knowledge as soon as they enter their clinical rotations and later serves them throughout their careers as healthcare providers.

Approximately 60 students are admitted per year to Chatham’s MPAS program, with a total full-time enrollment of 130. Students complete two didactic semesters at the University’s Chatham Eastside facility before beginning clinical rotations at various sites in the Pittsburgh region as well as around the U.S. and in other countries. Because of program growth and the need for physician assistants in Puerto Rico, this fall the University enrolled its first cohort of MPAS students in San Juan, Puerto Rico through a partnership with Universidad Metropolitana (UMet). The Puerto Rico cohort will complete two didactic semesters at UMet’s Bayamón Campus in San Juan, and clinical rotations at affiliated clinical sites in Puerto Rico.

The Expansion of Physician Assistant Training Program (EPAT) is a five-year initiative that will invest over $32 million in training for primary care PAs. The goal of the program is to increase student enrollment in primary care PA programs and to produce 600 new primary care PAs by 2014. The program provides funds for student educational expenses, stipends, reasonable living expenses and indirect costs. For a maximum of two years, a total of $22,000 per year is allotted for each student. Tuition for Chatham’s MPAS is $11,799 per semester (not including books or equipment). The MPAS consists of 85 credit hours completed in 24 months.

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius noted this week in Washington, DC that “My home state of Kansas and Mary’s [Mary Wakefield, HRSA] home state of North Dakota experience shortages that are typical of rural areas, but we know that the rural areas are not the only underserved areas. Today, millions of Americans live in those areas. The communities don’t just need doctors. They need mental health providers, dentists, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners. And while the shortage has been looming for decades, President Obama and the Congress and those of us here at HHS, working with our partners, are committed to closing this gap as soon as possible.”

About Chatham University 
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to help develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.