Chatham University

Chatham News

Athletics’ mascot gets a new name

By: Lindsey Hyre, Athletic Department
March 31, 2011

PITTSBURGH (March 31, 2011) . . . The official name of the Chatham University mascot, the Cougar, was revealed to the campus community yesterday. The Cougars’ first name will be Carson, in honor of Rachel Carson, the University’s most distinguished alumna.

Carson, who graduated in 1929 from what was then known as the Pennsylvania College for Women, was best known for her contribution to environmental issues such as the impact of toxic chemicals on the earth. She died at the age of 56 from breast cancer, just two years after publishing her seminal book, Silent Spring, detailing these issues.

Chatham established the Rachel Carson Institute in 1989 to continue Carson’s legacy by promoting the awareness and understanding of significant and current environmental issues through national and regional conferences, debates, lecture series, seminars, panel discussions, and other educational programs. Carson continues to serve as a role model in the sciences, advocacy, and environmental fields worldwide, and her name will now cheer on the university’s nine varsity athletic teams as the first official name for the Cougar mascot for Chatham.

The Cougar became the mascot for the school’s athletic programs soon after Dr. Esther Barazzone became President of Chatham in 1992. According to official records, the University’s mascot officially became the Cougar in December 1995, just as Chatham was beginning the process of becoming an official member of the NCAA. Prior to this, the school’s mascot was a seal named Pennsy, who first appeared in 1946.

In fall 1997 Chatham became a full member of the NCAA, and officially joined the Presidents’ Athletic Conference in fall 2007.

The “Name the Cougar Challenge” has been an on-going process for the past month. Students, faculty, and staff around campus nominated over 150 possible names for the Cougar. The field was narrowed from 150 to 14 nominations and these names were voted upon by the Chatham community. The winning name, Carson, was officially unveiled yesterday, March 30th, after the softball contest against Penn State University-New Kensington, which ended in a 10-4 victory for the Cougars.

“I am thrilled that the campus community has come together with such support to choose a first name for our mascot. This particular name honors Chatham’s past as well as brings new excitement to our future,” Athletic Director David Zinn commented.

“I can’t think of a better choice than having Carson for our mascot’s name. It is great to see campus spirit be so alive at Chatham,” remarked Zauyah Waite, Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students.

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to help develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Every Chatham student – women in Chatham’s historic women’s residential college, and men and women in Chatham’s graduate programs – receives a highly individualized, experiential educational experience that is informed by Chatham’s strong institutional commitment to globalism, the environment and citizen leadership. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with Chatham Eastside and the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum, and the 388-acre Eden Hall Farm Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Chatham faculty and students present a special benefit concert and reception to Celebrate Japan on April 2

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
March 28, 2011

PITTSBURGH (March 25, 2011) … Chatham University’s Japanese students along with Pauline Rovkah, director of the music program, and Bruce Rosenthal, director of business programs, are combining their talents and love for Japan to present a concert and reception to benefit the survivors of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Celebrate Japan will feature some of Pittsburgh’s most accomplished musical artists, as well as a showcase of Japanese culture, on Saturday, April 2. For more information call 412-365 2433 or email brosenthal@chatham.edu.

The event begins with a concert of classical, jazz and contemporary music at 3:00 p.m. in the Campbell Memorial Chapel, followed immediately after with a reception featuring Japanese art, food and clothing in the James Laughlin Music Hall. Suggested donations for the concert are $15 for adults and $5 for students; and $5 for adults and students at the reception. Donations benefit Brother’s Brother Foundation and will be accepted at the door; no reserved seats are available.

“So many of us at Chatham have connections with Japan – friends, colleagues and family – from our international students and faculty as well as me and my wife, Yoko. All of us have been concerned about our families and friends since the tragedy, but also concerned with the tens of thousands of Japanese people whose lives have been destroyed,” Mr. Rosenthal said. “Although the country has already started the process of rebuilding they are still in need of supplies and humanitarian aid for the survivors. This is an opportunity not only for Pittsburgh’s strong Japanese community to come together but also for our fellow Pittsburghers to join in support of those people 6,000 miles away who – in the end – are our fellow travelers.”

The concert will feature:
Mark Huggins, associate concertmaster PSO
Tatjana Chamis, associate principal viola PSO
Michail Istomin, cello PSO
Michael Lipman, cello PSO
Jennifer Orchard, violin PSO
Yuko Uchiyama, violin PSO
Jeff Grubbs, bass PSO
Betsy Heston, assistant principal bass PSO
Micah Howard, bass PSO

Lilly Abreu, soprano
Roger Zahab, violin
David Bennett, cello
Yeeha Chiu, piano
Pittsburgh Baroque Ensemble (PBE), Rick Murrell artistic director, trumpet
Pauline Rovkah, piano
Leon Salcedo, guitar
Takeaki Miyamae, flute

Maureen Budway, jazz vocalist
Jessie Glovier, jazz vocalist
Tania Grubbs, jazz vocalist
Kenia, jazz vocalist
Jessica Lee, jazz vocalist
Donna Bailey Sauers, jazz vocalist
Genie Walker, jazz vocalist
Howard Alexander, jazz piano
Thomas Glovier, jazz piano
Roger Humphries, drums
Daniel May, jazz piano
Eric Susoeff, guitar

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to help develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Consistently ranked among the top master’s level institutions in the Northeast by U.S. News & World Report and The Princeton Review, Chatham University is also ranked in the top five percent of graduate-intensive institutions nationally and experienced the fastest-growing enrollment in the Pittsburgh region over the past decade. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum and Chatham Eastside facility; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Rachel Carson Institute hosts an evening forum on air pollution in western Pennsylvania

Fiona Fisher, RCI Communication and Outreach Specialist

By: 
March 25, 2011

PITTSBURGH (March 25, 2011) … Don Hopey and David Templeton, authors of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Mapping Mortality series, will lead an evening forum with individuals featured in the series. The Stories, The Science and The Solutions: Air Pollution in Western Pennsylvania will pull the people from the pages to share their struggles and concerns. A question and answer session will follow, allowing the audience to ask questions of the authors, the featured individuals, air quality and health experts, as well as representatives from the EPA Region 3 office in Philadelphia.

Hosted by Chatham University’s School of Sustainability and the Environment and the Rachel Carson Institute, the forum will be Wednesday, March 30 at 5:30 p.m. in Chatham’s University’s Eddy Theater. The event is free and open to the public. Supporting organizations include the Sierra Club, Clean Water Action, Women for a Healthy Environment, The Center for Coalfield Justice, Citizens for Pennsylvania’s Future (PennFuture), The Environmental Integrity Project and The Group Against Smog and Pollution. For more information call 412-365-2498 or email ffisher@chatham.edu.

AGENDA:
5:30 p.m.
Reception with informational tables from groups involved and hair testing for mercury by the Sierra Club

6:00
Welcome from David Hassenzahl, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Sustainability and the Environment at Chatham University. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporters Don Hopey and Dave Templeton will give an overview of their series Mapping Mortality that will include a short film by Post-Gazette videographer Doug Oster.

6:45
Members from various communities from around the region will share their stories, featuring photographs from the series as captured by Post-Gazette photographer Robin Rombach.
• Deb Evans – mother of four from Elrama – she lives near the GenOn Energy’s Elrama Power Plant in the Monongahela Valley.
• Herman Marshman – President of IBEW Local 272 at the First Energy’s Bruce Mansfield Power Plant and is concerned about the health of the workers at the plant as well as folks sharing the fenceline.
• Yma Smith – lifelong resident of LaBelle, PA – a small town in the shadow of one of our region’s coal ash dumps that receives ash from several coal-fired power plants.
• Janet Strahosky – activist from Avalon, PA concerned about the affects of pollution from Neville Island on her community.
• Martin Gariggan – Resident of Springdale, PA concerned about the affect GenOn Energy’s Cheswick Power plant is having on his community.

7:30
Environmental and health experts will introduce themselves with a brief presentation
• PatriciaDeMarco – Director, Rachel Carson Institute
• Neil Donahue – Professor of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and Engineering andPublic Policy at Carnegie Mellon University
• John Graham – Senior Scientist at Clean Air Task Force

8:00
Representatives from the Region 3 Office of the Environmental Protection Agency will discuss the Environmental Protection Agency’s role in protecting public health
• Jacqueline Lewis – Environmental Engineer, Region 3 EPA Office
Responsible for Pennsylvania’s State Implementation Plan, Jacqueline recently participated in a tour of the Mon Valley hosted by Clean Water Action.
• Cathleen Kennedy – Community Air Toxics Coordinator, Region 3 EPA Office

8:20
Questions from the Audience

8:50
Randy Francisco the Sierra Club’s Pennsylvania Beyond Coal to Clean Energy Organizing Representative will discuss next steps and actions you can take.

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to help develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Consistently ranked among the top master’s level institutions in the Northeast by U.S. News & World Report and The Princeton Review, Chatham University is also ranked in the top five percent of graduate-intensive institutions nationally and experienced the fastest-growing enrollment in the Pittsburgh region over the past decade. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum and Chatham Eastside facility; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

Three Rivers Clean Energy’s Janet Lauer discusses green business practices at next CWE Business Leaders Breakfast on April 8

By: Amanda Kennedy, Senior Public Relations Specialist
March 22, 2011

PITTSBURGH (March 22, 2011) … The Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University will host Three Rivers Clean EnergyDirector Janet Lauer, who will present “How Energy-Related Strategies and Investments can Bring Value to your Bottom Line” as part of the Women Business Leaders Breakfast Series on Friday, April 8, 2011, from 7:30-9:30 a.m. The $25 admission fee includes a continental breakfast and networking session which precede the presentation. Registration and information is available at www.chatham.edu/cwe or by calling 412-365-1253.

Ms. Lauer will tackle energy issues facing modern businesses – both large and small – and how business owners can become savvy energy consumers. Given the rising cost of conventional energy, coupled with concerns about meeting increasing demands, economical energy usage no longer has to eliminate formerly expensive green technologies. Ms Lauer will give valuable green strategies to not only develop greener business practices, but also increase the bottom line. When businesses take a hard look at the way they use energy, they often have trouble correctly identifying strategies to utilize their resources more efficiently. Ms. Lauer will speak about strategies and give action steps to help business owners better understand their options and where to find expert resources to help make informed decisions about energy use.

About Janet Lauer
Janet Lauer is the Director of Three Rivers Clean Energy (3RCE), an economic and workforce development initiative founded in 2006 with a mission to grow the energy industry in the southwestern Pennsylvania region. To accomplish this, 3RCE partners with a wide spectrum of regional and state stakeholders that together focus on five key areas: developing a qualified workforce; encouraging new technology; developing supportive government policy; attracting business investment; and educating and engaging citizens. Prior to taking on this role, Ms. Lauer served for nearly eight years as Senior Vice President of the Allegheny Conference on Community Development, a private, non-profit leadership organization dedicated to improving the economy and quality of life of the Pittsburgh region.

Ms. Lauer also spent 20 years in corporate research. She held the position of Operations Manager for the Northrop Grumman Science and Technology Center and had the opportunity to build the 150 person Pittsburgh-based research lab. Prior to that she served as Operations Manager for the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center and spent many years as a scientist in the labs as well, working primarily on energy related projects, including battery development for electric vehicles in cooperation with Chrysler Corporation and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. She holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Pittsburgh and a master’s degree from Carnegie Mellon University.

About CWE
The mission of the Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University is to educate, create economic opportunities, and foster entrepreneurial thinking for women entrepreneurs, women in business, and students. The Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University (CWE) provides opportunities for women entrepreneurs in both new development and growth stages of their businesses to start, develop and significantly grow their companies by utilizing Chatham resources, programs, faculty expertise, and student assistance. CWE also provides programming targeted to local and regional women in business. This programming is designed to teach women in business how to think and act entrepreneurially by focusing on innovation and creativity within the context of an existing organizational environment. And finally, CWE offers specific programs for both undergraduate and graduate students which help them learn the skills needed to become either successful entrepreneurs or successful women in business. For more information about programs offered by CWE call 412-365-1253 or visit www.chatham.edu/cwe

About Chatham University
Chatham University prepares students from around the world to help develop solutions to some of the world’s biggest challenges. Consistently ranked among the top master’s level institutions in the Northeast by U.S. News & World Report and The Princeton Review, Chatham University is also ranked in the top five percent of graduate-intensive institutions nationally and experienced the fastest-growing enrollment in the Pittsburgh region over the past decade. Founded in 1869, Chatham University includes the Shadyside Campus, with the historic 39-acre Woodland Road arboretum and Chatham Eastside facility; and the 388-acre Eden Hall Campus north of Pittsburgh. For more information call 800-837-1290 or visit www.chatham.edu.

A message from Dr. Barazzone regarding the tragedy in Japan

By: Esther L. Barazzone, Ph.D., President
March 14, 2011

Dear friends,

The Chatham University community is saddened by the devastation and suffering caused by the recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Our hearts go out to those who have suffered during this tragedy.

As students returned to campus following spring break, Student Affairs staff has been reaching out to all of the Japanese students studying at Chatham. We have not yet managed to reach all of them, but it appears initially that none of them are from the areas impacted by the earthquake and tsunami. If you are a student from Japan and have not yet been contacted by a Chatham staff member, please call the Student Affairs office (365-1286) or the International Programs office (365-2714) to let them know that you are okay.

We are also concerned about the many Japanese students who have studied here in recent years and are already back in Japan (e.g., students from the Kobe program). A number of you have written to express concern for Japanese students you have befriended in recent years. As one student wrote me earlier today, “I sincerely hope that Chatham has been able to keep in touch with the students from Japan who came to our school in Fall 2010. My sincerest prayers and blessings go out to them during these tragic times.” I can assure her and you that Chatham will reach out to those who have studied here in recent years to express our concern and support. I encourage each of you to do so as well.

As one would expect, Chatham’s Japanese students are terribly concerned for their family, friends and fellow citizens back home. A number of them have expressed interest in raising funds to support relief efforts in Japan. Our Student Affairs staff will keep the campus community informed as those efforts progress. Please do not hesitate to contact the Student Affairs office at the number above if you are interested in getting involved.

In the meantime, I hope you will reach out to your friends, colleagues and fellow students from Japan to show your support at this difficult time.

Sincerely,
Esther B.