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ALUMNA PROFILE: GEORGENA TERRY ’72

 You might say Georgena Terry forged her own path, but it would be the only cliché in her story. Georgena earned her first bachelor’s degree as a drama major at Chatham College. “I did lighting and tech. I was always more comfortable behind the scenes. I loved math and physics and all that stuff,” she says. Small wonder, then, that she earned her second bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University which Georgena completed in two years, due to having so many transferable credits from Chatham (Georgena also holds an MBA from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania).

Terry

A lifelong avid biker, Georgena became interested in bicycle frames, and built her first frame in her basement. It was an exact copy of the bike she was riding at the time, and she found herself questioning the choices that were made in its construction. It was a short step from there to hand-building frames for women’s bodies that were in increasing demand among women cyclists in her community. Recognizing an unmet need, Georgena launched Terry Precision Bicycles for Women, which grew to include award-winning components and apparel.

The accolades began to pile up: In 1996, Georgena was named one of four cycling pioneers by Bicycling magazine. In 2002, she was the only woman recognized in Outside Magazine’s list of 11 cycling innovators. In 2005, the Direct Marketing Association of New York named her Marketer of the Year.  And in 2010, Georgena received the Pioneering Woman award from Outdoor Industries.

As Georgena was being recognized, she was also working to engage and encourage women cyclists and to protect the wilderness that has always been so important to her. In 2001, she began to sponsor a women’s road racing team, focusing on developing young female riders. In 2006, Georgena donated thousands of dollars to breast cancer research and to grassland conservation efforts. In 2008, she held the first “Wild Goose Chase,” a fundraiser for the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Georgena sold Terry Bicycles in 2009. “The CEO said ‘Do you want to keep the handbuilt bicycles? We don’t have the expertise’,” Georgena recalls. “So I took that part with me.”

Today, that part is Heart of Steel Bicycles. Georgena notes that contrary to popular opinion, steel is a great choice for the serious cyclist. “Maybe it’s because of the diamond frame,” she muses. “…Tube diameters have increased and tubes that were once round may now be oval or tapered. But the frame is still a diamond.”

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH IN TAIWAN

Chloe Bell ’16 remembers an afternoon in Taiwan. “We pulled over on the highway one afternoon to eat hot peppers that an elderly couple had made and were selling.  The husband cut peppers into a marinating bucket as the wife offered us all of their other specialties. We found people like this everywhere in Taiwan: small time entrepreneurs who were using their skill set to make people happy, to co-exist in a symbiotic way.”

Bell was part of a research team of six undergraduate students (Diana Cabrera ’17, Ashley Henry ’14, Kristina Hruska ’16, Sook Yee Leung ’14, Rachel McNorton ’14) and two Chatham professors (Dr. Karen S. Kingsbury and Dr. Charlotte E. Lott) who spent four weeks in Taiwan over the summer, studying female entrepreneurs in small-scale, regionally-based restaurants and lodging businesses, with a focus on the following questions:

• What gender issues occur in women-owned businesses?
• How do women use relationship networks to start and maintain a business?
• How does family responsibility interplay with business responsibility?
• Do these women business owners consider themselves to be feminists?

The research team interviewed 14 women entrepreneurs in four areas across Taiwan. They also distributed around 30 surveys to other female entrepreneurs.The research is expected to produce a series of analytical profiles of the women entrepreneurs telling their stories and articles in the four areas of interest—gender issues for women business owners, relationship networks, family dynamics, and perception of feminism.

Preliminary findings include:

1) While for the most part, the women were either unfamiliar with or startled by the term “feminism,” associating it with a radical, extremist set of views that they did not share, when asked how they felt about gender equality, the women were very supportive.

2) In Taiwan, written contracts are secondary to verbal agreements and handshakes.

3) “The female entrepreneurs and the academics we talked to were not focused on making the most money or being the most successful in the Western sense,” says Bell.

4) “I formulated a theory in my own mind that Taiwan would be more like mainland China and less like a Westernized Society. I was greatly mistaken, “ said another student. (Dr. Kingsbury notes this as one reason why Taiwan is an excellent entry-point for US students and researchers interested in engaging with East Asian culture).

5.) “I discovered that while much of my thinking around female entrepreneurs centered on the concept of depending on relationship networks, the women showed a lot of agency in building community among their customers and/or employees,” says another.

Of course, there’s learning, and then there’s learning: “The students developed an excellent interview technique, “ noted Professor Lott. The undergraduate team also gained experience through applying for the grant, operating equipment, gathering data, analyzing findings, problem-solving, and adapting to new situations. “Being able to venture out on my own gave me a great deal of confidence and independence that I could not have earned any other way,” adds Kristina Hruska.

The project in Taiwan has benefited not just the participants, but the greater Chatham community. “The project has been a very effective way to boost the development of a fledgling Asian studies program at Chatham University,” says Dr. Kingsbury, noting that it has also spurred enthusiasm for Taiwan-based projects now in preparation, including a short-term faculty-led field experience focusing on green/sustainable architecture and eco-tourism, food studies, and travel writing currently being planned for 2016. The research team is now compiling a set of essays and photos that David Burke’s fall term course on Print Design will use as the basis for a class project.

Two weeks ago, at the ASIANetwork conference in St. Louis, the research was presented by Bell, Sook Yee Leong ’14, and Professor Lott. Learn more on the project blog, and check out the  2014 Chatham Student-Faculty Fellows report.

The study, Creative Entrepreneurialism, Relationship Networks, and Family Dynamics: A Study of Women-Led Hospitality Businesses in Regional Hubs of Taiwan, was funded was funded by the 2014 ASIANetwork Freeman Foundation Student-Faculty Fellows Program for Collaborative Research in Asia and by a Chatham University Grant.

EDEN HALL SUSTAINABILITY WORKSHOPS

With the opening of the new Field Lab at the Richland campus this past July, Eden Hall Campus offered this summer’s first-ever sustainability workshop series. The workshops were designed to share sustainability principles with quick payoffs that participants could easily incorporate into their homes and lives.

First up was Roof Runoff: Rainwater Harvest and Usage led by Tony Miga, a recent graduate of the Master of Sustainability program. This past year, Miga received funding to install three underground rainwater catchment tanks that drain the roof of the Eden Hall storage shed. These tanks can fill their 50,000-gallon capacity with only a few inches of rainfall. The workshop began with a tour of Eden Hall, including a stop to examine these 50,000-gallon cisterns.

Then, attendees were led to the lab where they were able to make low-cost, high quality rain barrels. Power drills in hand, attendees bore holes for spigots and hoses in basic blue buckets, creating home approved rain barrels that act as a perfect local water conservation method. Think of these rain barrels as a way to lower your water bill while watering your garden, and an eye-catching conversation starter for your neighbors and friends.

On August 14th, our Field Lab served as the stage for a workshop again, this time for a compost tutorial. Chatham University and Nancy Martin of Pennsylvania Resources Council (PRC) delivered a presentation on the basics of starting your own composting operation. Martin is the Environmental Educator at PRC, and hosts a number of basic composting and vermiculture (composting with worms) workshops around the city each year. She shared information about what can and can’t be composted, how to prevent rodents and bugs from getting into your handiwork, how to maintain your bin, and how to use your compost most effectively.

Following a full campus tour, the composting students settled into an evening of “How-To’s” to make their composting efforts a success. In order to provide them with the tools to successfully compost, students purchased an Earth Machine composting bin, which can hold up to 80 gallons of compost, as part of their admission. The true takeaway from this event is that composting gives new value to scrap materials that would otherwise go to waste in the garbage. Soil made from composting is more nutritious, can be used as mulch, and overall is the economical choice for a healthy yard.

The concluding workshop for our Summer Series at Eden Hall was entitled Harness the Sun: Home Projects and Energy Saving Tips. The solar workshop centered around how homeowners can determine whether their houses are ready for solar panel installation, how it works, and policies in Pennsylvania that support solar technologies on homes. Dr. Mary Whitney, Sustainability Coordinator at Chatham, and Phil Long, a Burns & Scalo sales professional, delivered a presentation that highlighted important facts to consider about solar home energy, as well as taking note of small energy “zappers” around your home that use up more electricity than you might think.

Dr. Whitney provided participants with worksheets that calculate how much energy is consumed by household activities. She then brought out a Kill-A-Watt meter, a small instrument that plugs into electrical devices to show the real-time usage. Attendees were amazed by just how much energy devices consume, even to make something as simple as a cup of coffee. Dr. Whitney then offered tips on how to adapt solar energy to a personal home.

We are looking forward to hosting more lifelong learning workshops at Eden Hall this year, so stay tuned in and we’ll see you in Richland!

DEAN OF INNOVATION: DR. LENZ PREPARES FOR THE FUTURE

Lenz 960x540Dr. William (Bill) Lenz, Pontious Professor of English, has been at Chatham for 34 years. Bill has served as the Chair of the Humanities and the director of the Chatham Scholars program; traveled with students to Ecuador, the Galapagos Islands, Belize, Guatemala and Haiti; founded and grown the Masters in Professional Writing program from eight students to 100 students and moved it completely online; and written three books and numerous papers and articles on American literature and culture. In September, Pittsburgh Magazine nominated him as one of Pittsburgh’s “Best Professors.”

This June, President Esther Barazzone appointed him to the newly-created position and nation’s first Dean of Undergraduate Innovation. In this role, Dr. Lenz will work with all University constituencies to review institutional practices and curriculum at the undergraduate level to determine ways in which Chatham can best serve students and society in a world in which “disruptive change” has become the norm in higher education.


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