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Chatham University Recognized for Civic Learning & Democratic Engagement

PITTSBURGH: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA) has honored Chatham University as a “Lead Institution” in NASPA’s Lead Initiative on Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement for its strong institutional commitments to civic learning and democratic engagement. Chatham is one of only 100 colleges and universities to hold a place in NASPA’s Lead Initiative for the 2014-2015 academic year.
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CAMPUS COMMUNITY PROFILE: CHRIS MUSICK, M.S.

Musick-1024x683Title: Assistant Vice President for International Affairs
Hometown: Yorktown, Indiana
Pittsburgh neighborhood: I’m currently deciding between Squirrel Hill and Shadyside. I like being able to walk places, and I don’t have a car in town. I signed up for the Bike to Work program, and I have the bicycle that I bought off my brother when I was in 8th grade for $40 and a large pizza. The bike has been refurbished throughout the years that I’ve been riding, but it’s a cherished piece of my childhood.

What are your goals for International Affairs?
For one, I’m looking forward to helping to implement the Chatham semester, which is like a reverse study abroad program. We want it to be a destination for students around the world who want to study in America for a semester or a year. To encourage this, we’re becoming more flexible with our ESL programs – they’ll now be 7-week sessions and start at different points during the years, to help accommodate other countries’ academic calendars. Another way that we’ll internationalize our community is through activities, speakers, presenters, and curriculum development. And, of course, we’ll be pursuing strategic relationships around the globe.

How do you decide which relationships to pursue?
We’re very interested in developing relationships that enhance our understanding of what we’re able to do here and take advantage of opportunities to learn even more. For example, Chatham has a robust sustainability program, and we’re also global in outlook. There’s a lot we can learn from studying sustainability in different biomes, like the arctic, the desert, and the tropics. What are the challenges of creating sustainable practices in different environmental zones? How do you grow crops in Norway? We’re looking to partner with institutions where we can learn from them, and they from us.

We’re also interested in partnering with institutions where there are layers of academic overlap that can help us create deeper relationships with the community and within our academic programs. For example, we might have a student group of healthcare workers visit a community to investigate what might be behind the learning disorders that affect a large number of local children. Say they link it to cooking stoves inside the house leaking carbon dioxide. Then we could have interior design students going down and designing a new stove that uses local resources and can be built efficiently and at low cost that doesn’t emit carbon dioxide. And of course, we want to develop relationships with universities that mirror what we’re doing to a certain extent, so that if students study abroad, they’re still able to graduate on time.

Chatham has so many points of pride, and this time of transition fosters a real outward-lookingness. There’s a lot of potential to moving into the international arena in a way that we haven’t been able to do before.

A NIGHT OUT WITH THE WOMEN OF CITY COUNCIL

“It wasn’t my plan to run,” Pittsburgh City Councilwoman Deborah Gross told the roomful of women following the casual wine and cheese networking reception. “It came as a surprise when the councilman retired. I was holding the phone with one hand and writing a list of all the people I knew who could run, 150 or so, with the other. And then I thought I want to be the one to do this.

On October 22, the women of Pittsburgh City Council – Councilwoman Gross, Councilwoman Darlene M. Harris, Councilwoman Theresa Kail-Smith, and Councilwoman Natalia Rudiak – spoke candidly about their experiences running for office and serving as councilmembers at A Night Out with the Women of City Council, an event sponsored by the Pennsylvania Center for Women and Politics.

“Sometimes being on City Council is like being in the CIA. You can prevent bad things from happening without anyone knowing.”
– Councilwoman Darlene Harris

“During my run, I had the feeling that I was an outsider,” said Rudiak. “No one was tapping me on the shoulder and telling me that I should run. The hardest part was knowing people my whole life and seeing them not support me because they didn’t think I could win.”

The councilwomen’s remarks were followed by a question and answer session, during which one woman asked: Is it time for us as women to think about a different kind of political party?

“I struggle with that, as a Democrat,” said Rudiak. “Right now, I think there’s an unprecedented effort to get new people to run in our party. It is really energized. Sometimes working within the system provides the best opportunities for change.”

“There will always be someone to manipulate you, no matter what party you’re associated with,” agreed Kail-Smith. “Do what it takes to work within your community.”

The councilwomen also offered advice for women who were considering entering politics, much of which centered on fortitude: Keep on moving and doing what you think is right. You need to be in a place where you’re okay with people not liking you, and you need to keep going anyway. They also encouraged interested attendees to register for Ready to Run™ Pittsburgh, a day of bipartisan political training to encourage women to run for government leadership positions held at Chatham on January 31, 2015.

The Pennsylvania Center for Women and Politics (PCWP) at Chatham University is a non–partisan center devoted to fostering women’s public leadership through education, empowerment, and action.

South African Ambassador to visit Chatham University; Will receive honorary degree

PITTSBURGH: Ebrahim Rasool, South Africa’s Ambassador to the United States of America, will visit Chatham University’s campus on Tuesday, October 21 as part of Chatham’s Global Focus Program. Ambassador Rasool will meet with the Chatham community and receive an honorary degree from Chatham during a special ceremony at 4 PM in Chatham’s Mellon Board Room.

Chatham’s award-winning Global Focus program engages Chatham students and faculty in the purposeful study of peoples and civilizations, and each academic year, promotes an exploration of one specific country or region of the globe. The 2014-2015 academic year is the Year of Southern Africa, which will focus on the southernmost expanse of the African continent including the countries of Angola,  Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and  Zimbabwe. The nations of this region are part of The Southern African Development Community (SADC) founded in 1980. More information at chatham.edu/globalfocus.
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Chatham Welcomes Assistant Professor of Sustainability and Business

PITTSBURGH: Chatham University and the Falk School of Sustainability are pleased to welcome Dr. Tom Macagno, Ph.D., to the campus as Assistant Professor of Sustainability and Business.

Dr. Macagno arrived at Chatham this September from the United Kingdom to teach in the Falk School’s programs including the new, dual masters degree in sustainability and business. This timely degree will expose students to applied sustainability principles in addition to eco-innovation, stakeholder engagement, communications and leadership, in particular.
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“Women Who Make & Create” is the focus of the October 14th, 9th Annual Think Big Forum, hosted by the Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University

“Makers” come to Chatham: Women who make highlighted at Chatham University entrepreneurship forum for women business owners

PITTSBURGH—The ninth annual Think Big Forum hosted by the Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University will focus on “Women Who Make & Create.” Speakers include Georgena Terry, CEO of Heart of Steel Bicycles, Chatham University Alumnae and creator of custom bikes for women; Lani Lazzari, CEO & Founder of Pittsburgh-based Simple Sugars, a national success and a “Shark Tank” star; and Heather Knight, founder and chief roboticist of Marilyn Monroebot, a pioneer in the intersection of robotics and entertainment. These amazing women will share their struggles, successes, and tips for building a business out of making at the evening forum to be held on Tuesday, October 14th from 4:30pm-8:00pm at Chatham University’s Shadyside Campus.
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