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For the 4th Year in a Row, Chatham Admitted to President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll

PITTSBURGH: For the fourth consecutive year, Chatham University has been admitted to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for engaging its students, faculty, and staff in meaningful service that achieves measurable results in the community. The Honor Roll’s Presidential Award is the highest federal recognition an institution can receive for its commitment to community, service-learning, and civic engagement.
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Chatham University 2015 Black History Month Activities Announced

PITTSBURGH:  Chatham University is proud to sponsor the following activities and events in commemoration of Black History Month throughout the month of February.  If registration is required, please register on MyChatham.edu. Sponsored by:  Black Student Union, Jennie King Mellon Library, Parkhurst Dining Services, Relay for Life & Office of Residence Life & Student Activities – Student Affairs.

Black History Month Display
February 1-28
JKM Library

Black History Month Celebration at Relay for Life
Friday, February 6
Noon-Midnight, AFC Gym

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STARBUCKS CO-FOUNDER ADDRESSES STUDENTS AT BUSINESS MIXER

“Starbucks was not started by a guy in a nice suit with gray hair,” says the man in the nice suit with gray hair. This is Zev Siegl, and, to be fair, it’s been a couple years since he and two friends started Starbucks in 1970. Since then, the success of Starbucks may be best encapsulated in a 1998 headline from the satirical newspaper The Onion: “New Starbucks Opens In Restroom Of Existing Starbucks.” On January 22, Siegl shared some thoughts on entrepreneurship with Chatham students.

A few highlights:

Pick the right type of business
“We had an unfair advantage,” says Siegl. “Caffeine makes for a lot of repeat customers.” Until 1983, Starbucks – which started as a retail shop selling ground coffee, equipment and spices – gave away cups of coffee in the stores. “There were no gourmet coffee stores in Seattle in 1970,” he says. “We wanted to build affection for coffee that’s thoughtfully produced.”

Starbucks gradually expanded into roasting their own beans, then making beverages. The first coffee bar opened in 1983. “Now we were in three businesses,” says Siegl. “Roasting, retailing, and selling beverages.”

Grow slowly.
“The idea is anathema these days, because of the window of opportunity,” Siegl admits. “But we grew slowly. After ten years, we had six stores. Right now, there are 12,000 in the U.S. alone.” Siegl also mentioned that growing slowly allowed them to manage their costs too, citing postponing purchases until the business is profitable as one way to reduce expenses.

Consider alternate sources of funding.
“There’s a tendency for the first-time entrepreneur to get bogged down in the business plan. You need to focus on the Excel spreadsheet – the financial forecast,” says Siegl. “You’ll probably be stunned by how much money you need. But you can take advantage of grants and other government programs, get customers to prepay before opening day, do trades and exchanges of services or equipment, or just do it yourself.”

Find a mentor.
“Find a mentor who really has the keys to the kingdom and say ‘let’s go have dinner,’” says Siegl, who cites Alfred Peet of Peet’s Coffee & Tea as his mentor.

Be strategic about product development.
In the late 80’s, Starbucks introduced Frappucinos to fulfill a marketing need. People who came in for their morning coffee now had a reason to come back in the afternoon.

Add value.
“Get involved with a social good,” Siegel says. “Collect money from customers for organizations doing good in the community. Think of it as an opportunity to give back.”

Ready-to-Run Training Helps Women Candidates Prepare for the 2015 Municipal Elections

PITTSBURGH: To help address historically low levels of representation of women in Pennsylvania government, The Pennsylvania Center for Women and Politics (PCWP) at Chatham University is holdings its 4th annual Ready to Run™ Campaign Training for Women on Saturday, January 31st at Chatham University in Pittsburgh.

According to PCWP data, at the state and local government level women comprise only:

• 17.8 percent of state legislators (representatives and senators)
• 19 percent of municipal executives (e.g. mayors)
• 37.5 percent of county officials (e.g. councilmembers, etc.)
• 35 percent of elected school board members
• 27 percent of the state’s more than 1300 various elected judicial offices

At the same time, there is only one woman serving as a statewide elected official and none at all in the state’s congressional delegation. Research shows that when women run, they win at the same rates as men. If the state is going to increase the number of women holding public office, it needs more women candidates.
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Chatham University and Propel Schools launch the Pittsburgh Urban Teaching Corps

PITTSBURGH: Propel Schools, a non-profit federation of public charter schools, and Chatham University launch the Pittsburgh Urban Teaching Corps program in an effort to put more K-12 teachers in urban neighborhood schools.

Students accepted into the program will have the tuition for their Master of Arts in Teaching degree from Chatham University paid for by Propel Schools in exchange for two years of employment as a full-time teacher in a Propel School following the completion of their degree.

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CAMPUS COMMUNITY PROFILE: RACHEL CHUNG, PH.D.

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Title: Director of Business Programs

Before joining Chatham in 2013, while at Carlow University, Dr. Chung was featured on a BBC World News story about Twins Days Festival, the world’s largest gathering for twins and multiples. At the festival, Dr. Chung and her team gathered data from more than 200 pairs of twins, seeking to determine whether there was a genetic basis for online behavior. Originally from Taiwan, Dr. Chung now lives in the North Hills. Her personal interests include cooking and hunting for dinosaurs with her son Connor.

What do you think about the integration of graduate and undergraduate business programs?

I should start by saying that our programs have always been administratively integrated. Now the academics will be integrated too. I think there will be some very positive changes. Take our Marketing faculty, for example. They used to teach only undergraduates, and our grad students were taught by professionals working in the field. But having a professor teach the graduate class means that he or she can connect the dots for the students. The professors keep track of industry trends, because it’s their research area and they’re immersed in it. Chatham’s MBA is an academics program, and we need to have Ph.D.s there. And it’s good for them, too. It means that they don’t have to teach so many classes outside their field of expertise. If you’re enrolled in a class, you really want the instructor to keep track of what’s changing in the field, and no one can keep track of everything that’s going on in six different fields. It’s just not possible. We’re also excited about increased opportunities for interaction between our graduate and undergraduate students.

Is there anything in place to promote that interaction?

Yes, and we’re working on developing more. For example, we used to hold separate mixers for undergraduate and graduate students. Now we’re combining them, and holding the mixer from 4:30pm, when most undergraduates are likely to be ending classes, to 6:30pm, close to when many graduate students begin their classes. I’d say it’s been very successful.

We’re also working with Sean McGreevey (Assistant Dean for Career Development) on opportunities to have some graduate-undergraduate mentoring. The mixers are a great mechanism for helping mentoring to happen. Students don’t have to coordinate their schedules, they can say “I’ll just meet you at the mixer!”

For updates about Business programs, check out the Chatham MBA blog »

Chatham University MLK Day of Service Activities for Monday, Jan 19

PITTSBURGH: Chatham University will honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with a Honorary Breakfast on Friday, January 16th and with activities for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service on Monday, January 19th.

All events are open to students, staff, faculty and their friends and family. Registration on MyChatham.edu.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Honorary Breakfast
Friday, January 16th
7:30 a.m.
Mellon Board Room

Keynote speaker:  Pastor Donovan Daniel

MLK & University Day of Service
Monday, January 19th
Check-in from 8:30-9:00 a.m.
The Athletic & Fitness Center (AFC)

Give back to the community in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. through service projects with 9 Mile Run, Kelly Strayhorn Theater, Friends of the Riverfront, and Student Conservation Association.

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FROM PRESIDENT BARAZZONE: A CALL FOR REFLECTION

ThinkstockPhotos-513393365Good morning,

I am writing to ask that we join as a community on whatever occasions we can, between now and January 20, the day after the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day observances, to focus on the meaning of civil discourse and freedom of speech. This request is triggered by the proximity of the massacres in France, both at the headquarters of the magazine “Charlie Hebdo” and at the Jewish grocery store, to the US commemoration of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. a great exemplar of non-violent resistance. In both the attack on the Hebdo magazine and the murder of Dr. King, racial and religious bigotry were involved. But that fact alone is not what links these events to us as a university and compels an institutional response.

As a university, we have, I believe, a special responsibility to speak any time we encounter this constellation of suppression of expression and bigotry. We do not teach only subjects and content. We also must model and foster the untrammeled intellectual and personal exploration of ideas and values in an environment of civility and respect for others’ views, regardless of how much they may conflict with our own. While it is understandable that some of the cartoons may have been offensive, the ability to engage in debate and disagreement, and to express one’s views without fear of death, is vital to a civil society and our essential humanity. The bracketed events of the murders of staff of “Charlie Hebdo”–and of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day–bring home once again the deep moral and intellectual importance of the pursuit of learning and free expression at institutions of learning everywhere. The raised pens of the French–the symbol of both learning and expression–make the link perfectly between journalism and the academy.

Just as so many leaders of different nations, and representatives of different religions and political parties joined arms in Paris this weekend to show solidarity against bigoted extremism, so too must we. By pausing, thinking, and discussing these events and our reactions to them we strengthen ourselves as the diverse learning community that we are to display the opposite values. I hope we will all take every opportunity to do this.

I have asked that flags be lowered until next Tuesday so that we are reminded of the meaning to our own liberties and humanity of such tragedies and events everywhere they occur. And equally important, we lower the flag in respect, commemoration, and to remind ourselves to listen to our own “better angels” as we go about the frequently conflictual processes of learning. Perhaps this is what we really ought to mean by “higher” education.

Sincerely,

Esther B.