Archive for November 11th, 2013

Women still struggling to win big-city mayoral jobs

Posted in In the News on November 11th, 2013 by admin – Be the first to comment

Correction: An earlier version of this article misstated the name of former Baltimore mayor Sheila Dixon.

NEW YORK — High-profile mayoral elections this year have already proved that the steps to City Hall remain steep for female candidates.

Only one of the nation’s 10 largest cities is run by a woman: Annise Parker of Houston, who faces re-election in November. Just 12 of the 100 largest cities have women in the top job, including Fort Worth, Baltimore and Las Vegas.

This year has seen two notable candidates falling short: Democrats Wendy Greuel in Los Angeles, who made it to a runoff and then lost, and Christine Quinn in New York, who was considered the front-runner for months only to come in third in a Sept. 10 primary.

Next week, Boston voters have a chance: Charlotte Golar Richie is one of a dozen candidates for mayor in the non-partisan preliminary election Sept. 24.

The political group EMILY’s List — which raises money for female candidates — has endorsed women running for mayor this year in 10 cities, including Minneapolis; Dayton, Ohio; and Tacoma, Wash. But three are now sidelined, including Anita Lopez, who did not make a runoff in Toledo, Ohio.“To be the chief executive, to be the person where the buck stops, that’s that kind of last hurdle for women in elective office,” says Debbie Walsh of Rutgers’ Center for American Women and Politics — who points out that big-city mayors wield considerably more power than individual members of Congress. “When you get to those really big cities where when you’re the chief executive you’re overseeing millions and millions of dollars in jobs and a big law enforcement presence, that’s where it seems to be a bit stalled out.” Read more on usatoday.com

Women can make a difference, but first must get a chance

Posted in In the News on November 11th, 2013 by admin – Be the first to comment

Posted: Tuesday, September 17, 2013 6:00 am | Updated: 1:21 pm, Wed Sep 18, 2013.

When looking at our current leadership, one glaring fact is evident: women are under-represented. The 2012 census report indicates that women make up nearly 51 percent of the population. However, only about 18 percent of seats are held by women in the 113th Congress (20 seats in the Senate and 78 in the House).

Why such a small percentage when women constitute half the population? Could this lack of representation contribute to the lack of satisfaction that constituents feel nationwide? And what can be done to encourage women to get involved in public leadership? Read More at the Bucks County Courier Times