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IMGALTTAG Volume III: Learning Science by Doing Science II - Electronics


Attracting Students to Magnetism and Electricity
Michaele A. Fisher
Quentin Roosevelt Elementary School

Are you looking for something to attract your students to learning about magnetism? Do you want investigations that will spark their enthusiasm about electricity? This curriculum unit is designed to provide simple investigations right at your fingertips. It will attract and spark the enthusiasm of elementary students who are studying magnets and electricity.

This unit will support the FOSS curriculum that is adopted by the Pittsburgh Public Schools and the Standards adopted by the Pittsburgh School District. Roosevelt Elementary students will have the opportunity to perform these added investigations on their own time at school as well as in their own homes.

The experiments will give students the chance to have fun while learning about science. Parents can join in when students conduct the experiments at home. Materials Are simple and will be available for students to borrow from the science room.   The students will report to the class when they have performed and completed their work.


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IMGALTAG Electricity: The Flow Is With You
By Joyce Jones
Quentin Roosevelt Elementary School

This curriculum unit was designed to provide average third grade students with opportunities to learn about electricity and magnetism. It is multidisciplinary as it involves writing, reading, history and art. Projects and experiments will encompass basic fundamentals in the introduction of electricity and magnetism within our everyday lives.

Through reading and discussions, students will become more familiar with the history and importance of electricity and magnetism while noting changes throughout the years. They will put their knowledge, creativity, and information together for a final written and oral presentation for the fourth grade. This knowledge will also help to build a bridge for the fourth grade unit on electricity.


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A Brief History of Electronics
(Using Graphic Organizers to Present  the History of Electronics)
By Peter A. Mamula
David B. Oliver High School

The history of Electronics parallels the history of Electricity in its beginnings. Electronics is a late scientific discipline, approximately only one hundred years old. Hence, the beginnings of electronics come from the physics and engineering of electricity, this seminar project shall start with the history of modern electricity. Therefore, by showing the common beginnings the unit will go directly into what could be considered the origins of Electronics to the present.

Secondly, this unit will present various types of graphic organizers to present this material to a classroom or a teacher training situation as how to use graphic organizers. This seminar project could be used to teach in various subjects such as History, Physics, General Science, Chemistry, Robotics, Computer Science History, or other interdisciplinary subject matter.


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Nature of Electronics
By Phyllis Roberts
David B. Oliver High School

As we go about our everyday lives, many people are not aware of how much electronics plays a part. In the morning, most of us use an alarm clock to wake up. We then turn on the lights to get dressed. If you’re a woman, you immediately flip on the hot curlers and if you’re a man, you need to use your electric shaver. You then hurry to get dressed and throw a hot pocket into the microwave for breakfast and grab your microwavable meal out of the freezer for lunch. All of these things we do on a daily basis without even thinking. No one pauses and asks, “How did the radio on my alarm clock come on? Why didn’t my hot curling iron or electric shaver short out the electricity in my house? How can I have on the lights, hot curling iron, electric shaver and microwave all at the same time without burning down my house? And finally, “Why didn’t they all shut off when I turned one of them off?” Many of these questions we’ll explore while we study the nature of electronics.

This curriculum unit is designed to introduce my students to electronics. It is designed for students between the ages of 16–18 and presently taking physics in grades 11-12. This unit will cover a span of 2-3 weeks. During these weeks, we will analyze circuitry, electricity and electrostatics and relate these concepts to our everyday lives through lab experiments, in-class assignments and independent assignments.


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Chatham University
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IMGALTTAG Pittsburgh Teachers Institute
Jointly sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University, Chatham University and the Pittsburgh Public Schools.
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