Chatham University

Innovation & Research

UPMC Shadyside Hospital Captures Magnet Recognition®

Sandra Rader UPMC Shadyside chief nursing officer and vice president of Patient Care Services and Shelley Watters director of professional development at UPMC Shadyside

Sandra Rader (sitting) UPMC Shadyside chief nursing officer and vice president of Patient Care Services and Shelley Watters director of professional development at UPMC Shadyside

When Chatham first launched the RN-to-BSN program in 2005, the University’s dedicated partner was UPMC Shadyside School of Nursing. Since then, UPMC Shadyside has been both an academic partner with and an admissions recruiter for Chatham’s other nursing programs, the Master of Science in Nursing and the Doctor of Nursing Practice. Because of its commitment to the programs, Chatham would like to recognize UPMC Shadyside for its most recent achievement – Magnet Recognition® status for excellence in nursing, awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®.

“One of the tenets of Magnet designation is promoting nursing education and we do that in part by offering access to quality programs such as Chatham’s RN to BSN program. We are also pleased to have an on-site MSN program and access to Chatham’s DNP program,” explains Sandra Rader, DNP, MSA, RN, UPMC Shadyside chief nursing officer and vice president of Patient Care Services. “By offering our nurses the opportunity to enhance their credentials through programs like the RN-to-BSN, this expands their knowledge base thereby improving the quality of care we deliver at the bedside, ultimately benefiting each patient.”

Only six percent of hospitals nationwide have been granted Magnet status, one of the highest achievements an organization can obtain in professional nursing. UPMC St. Margaret’s, Chatham’s other nursing partner, achieved Magnet designation in 2009.

UPMC Shadyside notes that Magnet candidates undergo a rigorous process that intricately examines a hospital’s nursing program to its very core. The program must meet national standards for nursing but also develop a “culture of transformational leadership, structural empowerment, exemplary evidence-based practice, advanced training, new knowledge application and innovations with measurable outcomes proving quality patient care.”

“Magnet recognition shows that our nurses are among the nation’s elite in delivering nursing care – it’s the gold standard of designations,” notes Shelley Watters, DNP, RN, director of professional development at UPMC Shadyside. Shelley earned her DNP from Chatham and developed a shared leadership model as her capstone project which was one of the tenets of achieving Magnet status. She now has presented her research both nationally and internationally.

“The DNP gives nurses a richer way of looking at things in order to implement practical and complementary programs that result in better outcomes for patients,” Shelley says. “Like achieving Magnet status, earning that advance degree ultimately benefits the patients we serve.” UPMC Shadyside’s Magnet Recognition is valid for four years, after which the hospital may apply for redesignation. Chatham University congratulates its nursing partner and the dedicated nurses and staff that helped to earn this honor.

 

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