Chatham University

Environmental Studies Curriculum

Environmental Studies stands at the intersection of many diverse fields – such as biology, chemistry, economics, English, and political science – bound together by a focus on the impact of humankind on ecological systems. Students complete a common core of courses and experiences which focus on experiential and service-learning as well as building environmental literacy, multidisciplinary problem-solving skills, and a community of environmentally-oriented students and faculty. Students leave the program with an understanding and appreciation of the natural world, the interconnectedness between social and natural systems, and tools for making positive contributions to environmental sustainability.

Program Requirements

+ Major Requirements (B.A. Degree)

60 credits, including
BIO248 Ecology

A study of the interrelation between organisms and their environment. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 143 and 144.

3
BIO248L Lab: Ecology

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO248. Four hours of laboratory or field experience per week. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO248. Additional Fee (s): Laboratory fee.

2
ECN102 Principles of Microeconomics: Decision-Making by the Firm and Consumers

The roles of the consumer and producer are studied in the context of the functioning of the price system in different market structures. Emphasis is placed on the factors that influence the distribution of income (rent, interest, profit, wages) in the economy and the economic influence of women and their purchase decisions in varying economies..

3
ECN355 Economic Analysis of Public Policy

This course develops microeconomic tools of analysis for policy problems through various policy applications. The course is broadly focused on evaluating the rationale for government intervention in the economy and evaluating the efficiency and distributional effects of government policies. The course covers issues such as health care, regulation and immigration.

3
ENV116 Global Environmental Challenges

This course explores the global implications of environmental issues. It is designed for all students interested in our global environment, one of the most critical issues of our time. The basic premise is that global ecological systems are in decline. This course will not only introduce students to the major issues causing or relating to this ecological decline, but also provide a template for thinking about and acting on solutions. Therefore, the focus is on active, participation-based learning, and students should leave the course ready to create environmental change.

3
ENV129 Our Fragile Earth: A Scientific Perspective

This course introduces students to a wide range of environmental issues from a scientific perspective. Specific topics vary from year to year, but this course utilizes lectures, discussions, laboratories, guest speakers and field trips to increase knowledge about environmental problems as well as increase scientific knowledge and literacy.

3
ENV129L Our Fragile Earth Lab

This lab offers hands-on opportunity to perform basic environmental lab skills, including sater testing, bioassay, and greenhouse experiment protocol. The course may be taken independently oas a freestanding environmental lab course. Two hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
ENV262 Environmental Economics

This course focuses on the study of the relationship between economic activity and the environment. It teaches students the economic perspectives and tools for analyzing environmental problems and evaluating policy solutions. The course covers both conceptual topics and real-world applications. Cross-listed as ECN 262. Prerequisite(s): Economics 102.

3
ENV225 Environmental Ethics

An investigation of some of the important moral issues generated by human interaction with the environment (natural entities, ecosystems, and other species), such as obligation to future generations, the theoretical foundations for an adequate environmental ethic, biodiversity preservation, environmentally sound development and cultural practices, responsibility to animals, and personal choices and lifestyles. Cross-listed as PHI 225.

3
ENV313 Special Topics

The Special Topics courses will vary by year to provide in-depth analysis of a particular environmental issue. Three hours of lecture s per week. Prerequisite(s): will be determined by the instructor.

3
ENV352 Environmental Organizations & Governance

This course explores national and international environmental advocacy and organizations through a historical, political and economic context. The evolution, status, and future of the environmental movement are examined. Topics covered include ozone depletion, global climate change, sustainable development, and corporate environmentalism. Students conduct an environmental public opinion or advocacy project. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
INTENV301 Internship - Environmental Studies

1
INTENV302 Internship - Environmental Studies

2
INTENV303 Internship - Environmental Studies

3
ENV425 Environmental Policy

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the theory and practice of environmental policies. The course focuses on the political and economic factors contributing to the success and failure of present environmental policies. Topics include the roles of government and the market in causing environmental problems, analysis of proposed means for resolving those problems, and the application of economic and political analyses to selected environmental issues. Cross-listed as POL 425. Prerequisite(s): One of the following courses: POL 101, ECN 101, ECN 102, or ENV 116, or permission of instructor.

3
ENV498 Tutorial: Environmental Studies

4
ENV499 Tutorial: Environmental Studies

4
MTH110 Elementary Statistics

Topics include statistical measures and distributions, decision making under uncertainty, application of probability to statistical inference, linear correlation, introduction to nonparametric statistical methods, and application to problems drawn from the natural and social sciences. Three hours of class per week. Three hours of class per week.

3
PSY213 Statistics and Research Design

This course is designed to introduce students to essential research tools. Topics include frequency distributions, indices of central tendency, variability, and various inferential statistics, including nonparametric techniques. This course also examines research design procedures with an emphasis on analysis of variance. Priority given to psychology, social work and forensics majors. Prerequisite(s): PSY 101

3
POL101 American Government and Public Policy

This course provides an introduction to the principles and practices of government, federalism, with special attention to the policy process, political participation and selected political issues in the United States.

3
One 200 – level History (HIS) or Political Science (POL) course
One of the following courses:
ECN301 Econometrics

This course provides an introduction to the theory and application of the estimation of economic relationships. Topics include simple and multiple regression, hypothesis testing, multicollinearity, serial correlation, hetero-skedasticity, and simultaneous equation models. Students use computer software statistical packages to analyze data and test hypotheses. Prerequisite(s): ECN 101 and 102; MTH 110 or PSY 213.

3
ENV327 Writing about Environmental Science

This course is designed for students with some basic scientific skills, who might become scientists professionally, but all of whom will be communicating about science, often to non-scientists. In this course, we will read, discuss, and practice a variety of methods of communicating about environmental science, from popular culture to news to government reports. Students will competently translate scientific results into written journalistic English and will be able to evaluate scientific results from the news in terms of its scientific accuracy and clarity. Cross-listed as ENG327. Prerequisite: any 200-level ENV course or permission of the instructor.

3
One 300- level Policy course
3 of the following courses:
BIO224 Botany

An introduction to the structure and function of plants. Topics include the evolutionary rise of green plants, plant life cycles and development, plant physiology, plant ecology, and the morphology and taxonomy of vascular plants. The importance of plants fro humans is discussed, including their use for food and medicine. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 143 and 144.

3
BIO224L Lab: Botany

Experiments to complement the material presented in BIO224. Four hours of laboratory or flield experience per week. Corequisite or prerequisite: BIO224. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fees.

2
BIO226 Toxicology

An introduction to toxic substances, their classification, entry into living systems, modes of action, and fate. Various living systems are considered, from the subcellular to the ecosystem level. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO143 and 144, and CHM 109 and 110

3
ENV147 Environmental Geology

Fundamental earth science concepts are used to assess the impact of increasing global population and development on the Earth’s natural resources as well as to examine how natural processes interact with human activities. Aspects of environmental geology that are particularly applicable to western Pennsylvania are emphasized. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

4
ENV230 Wilderness- Food Sustainability

Wilderness and farms are typically considered to be separate, but the ecology of farms can both mimic and support the ecology of wild spaces. In this course, students visit a range of wild and semi-wild spaces, plus a working farm, and learn about ecolobical and environmental interactions between food production and nature preservation. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
ENV242 Women and the Global Environment

This course will examine contemporary global environmental issues from a gendered perspective. It will address the following question: How does environmental change impact women’s lives, women’s health, women’s community roles, and how are women offering leadership to address these problems and offer alternative solutions at the global, national, and local levels? The course will examine these issues from a North/South perspective, examining how northern countries' consumption and policies are impacting women in poor and transitional countries. It will also focus on key environmental concerns, from climate change, resource extraction, population, consumption, and toxic contamination.

3
ENV250 Plants, People, and the Environment

An introduction to the uses of plants by humans. Topics include the form, structure and genetics of plants related to their use as sources of food, shelter, fiber, flavors, beverages, drugs, and medicines. Plant structure and reproduction are studied in lecture and in-class activities with a particular focus on relationships between the plant's structural, chemical, or physiological attributes and the agricultural plant. Agricultural policies will also be discussed. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
Any 300 or 400 level ENV courses

+ Minor in Environmental Policy

6 courses, including
ENV116 Global Environmental Challenges

This course explores the global implications of environmental issues. It is designed for all students interested in our global environment, one of the most critical issues of our time. The basic premise is that global ecological systems are in decline. This course will not only introduce students to the major issues causing or relating to this ecological decline, but also provide a template for thinking about and acting on solutions. Therefore, the focus is on active, participation-based learning, and students should leave the course ready to create environmental change.

3
ENV129 Our Fragile Earth: A Scientific Perspective

This course introduces students to a wide range of environmental issues from a scientific perspective. Specific topics vary from year to year, but this course utilizes lectures, discussions, laboratories, guest speakers and field trips to increase knowledge about environmental problems as well as increase scientific knowledge and literacy.

3
ENV129L Our Fragile Earth Lab

This lab offers hands-on opportunity to perform basic environmental lab skills, including sater testing, bioassay, and greenhouse experiment protocol. The course may be taken independently oas a freestanding environmental lab course. Two hours of laboratory per week. Additional Fee(s): Laboratory fee.

1
ENV230 Wilderness- Food Sustainability

Wilderness and farms are typically considered to be separate, but the ecology of farms can both mimic and support the ecology of wild spaces. In this course, students visit a range of wild and semi-wild spaces, plus a working farm, and learn about ecolobical and environmental interactions between food production and nature preservation. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
ENV250 Plants, People, and the Environment

An introduction to the uses of plants by humans. Topics include the form, structure and genetics of plants related to their use as sources of food, shelter, fiber, flavors, beverages, drugs, and medicines. Plant structure and reproduction are studied in lecture and in-class activities with a particular focus on relationships between the plant's structural, chemical, or physiological attributes and the agricultural plant. Agricultural policies will also be discussed. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
ECN102 Principles of Microeconomics: Decision-Making by the Firm and Consumers

The roles of the consumer and producer are studied in the context of the functioning of the price system in different market structures. Emphasis is placed on the factors that influence the distribution of income (rent, interest, profit, wages) in the economy and the economic influence of women and their purchase decisions in varying economies..

3
ENV425 Environmental Policy

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the theory and practice of environmental policies. The course focuses on the political and economic factors contributing to the success and failure of present environmental policies. Topics include the roles of government and the market in causing environmental problems, analysis of proposed means for resolving those problems, and the application of economic and political analyses to selected environmental issues. Cross-listed as POL 425. Prerequisite(s): One of the following courses: POL 101, ECN 101, ECN 102, or ENV 116, or permission of instructor.

3
ENV262 Environmental Economics

This course focuses on the study of the relationship between economic activity and the environment. It teaches students the economic perspectives and tools for analyzing environmental problems and evaluating policy solutions. The course covers both conceptual topics and real-world applications. Cross-listed as ECN 262. Prerequisite(s): Economics 102.

3
POL101 American Government and Public Policy

This course provides an introduction to the principles and practices of government, federalism, with special attention to the policy process, political participation and selected political issues in the United States.

3