Curriculum | Chatham University, Pittsburgh, PA

Chatham University

Chemistry Curriculum

Approved by the American Chemical Society, the curriculum includes intensive preparation for graduate study and careers in the chemical industry or governmental laboratories.

Program Requirements

+Major Requirements (B.A. Degree)

44 credits, including:
CHM105 General Chemistry

This class covers the same material as Chemistry 107 below, but is specifically structured for students who have had little or no previous chemistry experience, or who need extra help with algebraic problem solving. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM107 Chemistry I

This class begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM108 Chemistry II

The second semester of general chemistry continues exploring the structure, properties, and bonding of atoms and molecules, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite: CHM 110.

3
CHM205 Organic Chemistry I

Development of the structural theory of organic compounds. Relationship of structure to reactivity, stereochemistry, types of organic reactive intermediates, and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds are covered. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 215.

3
CHM206 Organic Chemistry II

Discussion of organic functional groups and their chemistry. Spectroscopy, mechanisms, and synthetic type-reactions are included. A discussion of biologically important compounds is covered during the last third of the term.

3
CHM209 Inorganic Chemistry

A descriptive survey of inorganic chemistry, including bonding theories, coordination compounds, electrochemistry, inorganic syntheses, and the chemistry of the transition metals. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
CHM498 Tutorial: Chemistry

4
CHM499 Tutorial: Chemistry

4
IND350 Scientific Research Methods

This course serves as an introduction to research literature and research methodology in the sciences. Students prepare a research proposal including literature review, experimental design and methods, budget, timetable, and bibliography. Other topics include professional presentation techniques and research ethics. The student's major department must approve proposals prior to the Tutorial.

2
MTH151 Calculus I

This is the first course in the calculus sequence. Topics include differential and integral calculus for algebraic and trigonometirc functions with applications. Four hours of class per week.

4
9 additional credits in chemistry at the 200-level or above.

+Major Requirements (B.S. Degree)

72 credits including:
CHM105 General Chemistry

This class covers the same material as Chemistry 107 below, but is specifically structured for students who have had little or no previous chemistry experience, or who need extra help with algebraic problem solving. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM107 Chemistry I

This class begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM108 Chemistry II

The second semester of general chemistry continues exploring the structure, properties, and bonding of atoms and molecules, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite: CHM 110.

3
CHM205 Organic Chemistry I

Development of the structural theory of organic compounds. Relationship of structure to reactivity, stereochemistry, types of organic reactive intermediates, and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds are covered. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 215.

3
CHM206 Organic Chemistry II

Discussion of organic functional groups and their chemistry. Spectroscopy, mechanisms, and synthetic type-reactions are included. A discussion of biologically important compounds is covered during the last third of the term.

3
CHM209 Inorganic Chemistry

A descriptive survey of inorganic chemistry, including bonding theories, coordination compounds, electrochemistry, inorganic syntheses, and the chemistry of the transition metals. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
CHM311 Physical Chemistry I

Thermodynamic descriptions of chemical systems, emphasizing gases and solutions. Phase transitions and phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, kinetics, and electrochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
CHM312 Physical Chemistry II

Quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, introduction to symmetry, and introduction to statistical mechanics. Four hour lectures per week.

4
CHM322 Topics in Analytical Chemistry

This course explores the fundamental chemical principles underlying modern chemical instrumentation. Students learn the advantages and limitations of these instruments, how to select the proper instrumental configuration for a specific experiment, and how to evaluate emerging chemical technologies. Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite: CHM 318

3
CHM338 Biochemistry I

This course covers the structure and functions of proteins, polynucleic acids, and biological membranes. Enzymes and kinetics are taught. Metabolic pathways, with emphasis on the thermodynamics of the equilibria and the storage and usage of energy, are covered. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
CHM498 Tutorial: Chemistry

4
CHM499 Tutorial: Chemistry

4
IND350 Scientific Research Methods

This course serves as an introduction to research literature and research methodology in the sciences. Students prepare a research proposal including literature review, experimental design and methods, budget, timetable, and bibliography. Other topics include professional presentation techniques and research ethics. The student's major department must approve proposals prior to the Tutorial.

2
MTH151 Calculus I

This is the first course in the calculus sequence. Topics include differential and integral calculus for algebraic and trigonometirc functions with applications. Four hours of class per week.

4
MTH152 Calculus II

This is the second course in the calculus sequence. Topics include differential and integral calculus for the transcendental functions, advanced methods of integration, and infinite sequences and series.

4
PHY251 Principles of Physics I

Introduction to the concepts, laws, and structure of physics. This is the first course in a calculus-based sequence that focuses on classical mechanics. Topics include vector analysis, kinematics, Newton’s laws, work, conservation of energy and momentum, collisions, gravity, harmonic motion, and wave phenomena.

4
PHY252 Principles of Physics II

Introduction to the concepts, laws, and structure of physics. The second course in a calculus-based physics sequence. Topics include thermodynamics, fluids, electricity, circuit analysis, magnetism, Maxwell’s equations, properties of light, and optics. Four hours of class per week.

4
3 credits in chemistry at the 400-level

+Interdisciplinary Major Requirements

13 courses, including:
CHM105 General Chemistry

This class covers the same material as Chemistry 107 below, but is specifically structured for students who have had little or no previous chemistry experience, or who need extra help with algebraic problem solving. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM107 Chemistry I

This class begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM108 Chemistry II

The second semester of general chemistry continues exploring the structure, properties, and bonding of atoms and molecules, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite: CHM 110.

3
CHM205 Organic Chemistry I

Development of the structural theory of organic compounds. Relationship of structure to reactivity, stereochemistry, types of organic reactive intermediates, and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds are covered. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 215.

3
CHM206 Organic Chemistry II

Discussion of organic functional groups and their chemistry. Spectroscopy, mechanisms, and synthetic type-reactions are included. A discussion of biologically important compounds is covered during the last third of the term.

3
CHM209 Inorganic Chemistry

A descriptive survey of inorganic chemistry, including bonding theories, coordination compounds, electrochemistry, inorganic syntheses, and the chemistry of the transition metals. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
CHM311 Physical Chemistry I

Thermodynamic descriptions of chemical systems, emphasizing gases and solutions. Phase transitions and phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, kinetics, and electrochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
1 course selected from CHM312, CHM322, CH338, or any 400-level chemistry course.
Students may take their tutorial in either chemistry or the cooperating program.

+Minor Requirements

26 credits including:
CHM105 General Chemistry

This class covers the same material as Chemistry 107 below, but is specifically structured for students who have had little or no previous chemistry experience, or who need extra help with algebraic problem solving. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM107 Chemistry I

This class begins with a study of atomic structure, then expands to cover chemical naming, patterns of reactivity, thermochemistry, the interaction of light and matter, atomic orbitals, ionic and covalent bonding, and molecular shapes. This class concludes with an introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 109

3
CHM108 Chemistry II

The second semester of general chemistry continues exploring the structure, properties, and bonding of atoms and molecules, with emphasis on the physical characteristics of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Three hours of lecture per week. Corequisite: CHM 110.

3
CHM205 Organic Chemistry I

Development of the structural theory of organic compounds. Relationship of structure to reactivity, stereochemistry, types of organic reactive intermediates, and the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds are covered. Three hours of lecture per week. Co-requisite: CHM 215.

3
CHM206 Organic Chemistry II

Discussion of organic functional groups and their chemistry. Spectroscopy, mechanisms, and synthetic type-reactions are included. A discussion of biologically important compounds is covered during the last third of the term.

3
CHM209 Inorganic Chemistry

A descriptive survey of inorganic chemistry, including bonding theories, coordination compounds, electrochemistry, inorganic syntheses, and the chemistry of the transition metals. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
CHM311 Physical Chemistry I

Thermodynamic descriptions of chemical systems, emphasizing gases and solutions. Phase transitions and phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, kinetics, and electrochemistry. Three hours of lecture per week.

3
CHM338 Biochemistry I

This course covers the structure and functions of proteins, polynucleic acids, and biological membranes. Enzymes and kinetics are taught. Metabolic pathways, with emphasis on the thermodynamics of the equilibria and the storage and usage of energy, are covered. Three hours of lecture per week.

3