Chatham University

Master of Science Programs in Infant Mental Health

Infant Mental Health (IMH) addresses the social and emotional well-being of very young children and their caregivers by building and strengthening secure, nurturing relationships. Chatham University was the first institution in the state of Pennsylvania to create academic programs that recognize and respond to this need. We offer two master's degrees and a certificate program.


Master of Science in Infant Mental Health Counseling (MSIMHC)

  • 60 credits
  • become a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC)
  • program offered full- or part-time
  • two internships and a practicum
  • community-based leadership opportunities
  • electives in the neonatal intensive care experience and foundations of family therapy
  • attend intensive infant mental health trainings with nationally-recognized experts once per term

Master of Science in Infant Mental Health (MSIMH)

  • 36 credits
  • program offered full- or part-time
  • classes completed on campus and online
  • coursework includes one observation class
  • attend intensive infant mental health trainings with nationally-recognized experts once per term

Program graduates work with infants and caregivers in a wide a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, social services, and non-profit services. Learn more.


Why Infant Mental Health?

Infants are not small adults. Expertise in facilitating care for them is increasingly important–and increasingly relevant–as our understanding of infant neuroscience advances. Few therapeutic interventions offer the opportunity to make such a long-lasting impact on the lives of others. This expertise–gained from a solid grounding in theory and significant supervised field experience–is well-recognized.

IMH practitioners must be aware of and attuned to the details that can provide game-changing insight into a relationship between a child and a caretaker. They must also be familiar with the challenges that may arise or be present at the outset. And to be optimally effective, they must be aware of their relationship to their own practice.