Chatham University

International Studies Curriculum

Chatham’s major in International Studies emphasizes cultural texts and histories, both classical and contemporary, in combination with practical experience and firsthand intercultural interaction. The core courses draw on humanistic intellectual traditions, in order to develop nuanced understandings of particular texts, topics, and problems within a broad and relevant historical, political, and cultural context. Completion of a regional concentration ensures practical grounding in language, historical and geographical understanding, and experiential learning; it also qualifies a student for financial and programmatic support for study abroad.

Likely career fields for an International Studies major include civic and non-profit work, international outreach, media and communications, and education. Careers in government and business are also achievable, especially if this major is complemented by additional study and experience. The major offers a foundation for graduate work in a variety of fields, including humanities, social sciences, and law.

Students may test out of some or all language requirement. They will not be given course credit but the requirement will be waived. Certificates must be at least 18 credits. In cooperation with the Chair of History, Political Science, and International Studies, students placing out of language must be sure that appropriate course work meets the 18 credit requirement.

The Department of History, Political Science, and International Studies also offers International Certificates for students in other programs. For information on the International Certificates click here.

Program Requirements

+Major Requirements

HIS100 Introduction to World History

This course is an introduction to world history from the rise of civilization to the present. It establishes and compares major themes in the leading civilizations of today’s world. It investigates the development of the modern world system and interpretations of its impact on these civilizations.

3
POL100 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Introduction to politics, policies, and political institutions outside of the United States. Includes concepts such as electoral systems, party systems, parliamentary and presidential systems, democratization, and political change in both Western and non-Western settings.

3
OR
POL104 Introduction to International Relations

A survey of significant patterns and trends in 20th-century world politics, modes of conducting relations among nations, instruments for promoting national interests, and current problems of economic and political interdependence.

3
FDT160 World Film History

This course presents an overview of the history of film by focusing on key countries, both Western and non-Western, whose film industries have made important contributions to world cinema and/or whose filmmakers have pioneered important film movements. The course places film industries and movements in the context both of cinematic history and history of the societies in question.

3
ENG204 World Literature

A critical approach to major writers in several world traditions, from various periods, including such representative authors as Chuang Tze, Plato, and Wole Soyinka, and such representative works as the "Book of Genesis," The Bacchae, and The Odyssey.

3
POL311W Selected Topics in Social Science Research

The course introduces methods and approaches used to describe, explain, and evaluate social science research. Students will get an introduction to an instructor chosen research topic. Students will learn to formulate questions, create a literature review, gather and evaluate evidence and provide feedback on outside research concerning the selected course topic. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor.

3
HIS490 Integrative Capstone

The integrative capstone , undertaken by the student during the senior year, is an extended project that helps the student complete their transition from an undergraduate student to a world-ready professional.  The study usually centers on the student’s major and may be conducted, at least in part, in the context of a group experience.  Such programs are crafted to meet the unique needs of each major, and could include, for example, fieldwork, theatre production, creative work in the arts, independent research, or independent readings. The integrative capstone in an interdisciplinary major must have the approval of both academic programs.  

3

+Asia Concentration Requirements

CST204W Introduction to East Asian Studies

An exploration of EAst Asian geography, hisotry, language, and culture from the Zhou Dynasty (ca. 1,000 BCE) to present times. Focus on China, Korea, Japan with reference to neighboring regions and discussion of Taiwan. Emphasis on arts, ideologies, and East Asian cultural sites in Pittsburgh area.

3
One (1) 200-level regional elective approved by program director
One (1) 200- or 300-level regional elective approved by program directory
Study Away Experience or internship abroad approved by program advisor (6-12)
An approved Asian language through the intermediate level

+Africa Concentration Requirements

HIS205W Africa, Past and Present

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the problems and promises of African development. It investigates the historical development of pre-independence society, culture, political institutions, and economic structures, and their interaction with post-independent economic problems and development strategies.

3
One (1) 200-level regional elective approved by program director
One (1) 200- or 300-level regional elective approved by program directory
Study Away Experience or internship abroad approved by program advisor (6-12)
An approved African language through the intermediate level

+Europe Concentration Requirements

HIS202W Introduction to Modern Europe

The impact of World War I on Europe, the crisis of democracy and rise of totalitarian ideologies in the interwar period, and the decline of European influence in the world after World War II provide the focal points of the course. It then explores the slow resurgence of Europe, prospects for European unity, and revived European influence in international relations as a "third force."

3
One (1) 200-level regional elective approved by program director
One (1) 200- or 300-level regional elective approved by program directory
Study Away Experience or internship abroad approved by program advisor (6-12)
An approved European language through the intermediate level

+Latin American Concentration Requirements

HIS200W Introduction to Latin American History

This course surveys Latin American history from colonization through the present with an emphasis on world hisotry themes. While the legacies of the colonial period will be briefly examined, the course will focus primarily on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Global themes will include the spread of European religions among indigenous populations;reverberation of liberal revolutionary ideas in the western hemisphere; the incorporation of Latin American and its populations into the world economy; the influence of race on society; and the spread of Marxism and resulting revolutions.

3
One (1) 200-level regional elective approved by program director
One (1) 200- or 300-level regional elective approved by program directory
Study Away Experience or internship abroad approved by program advisor (6-12)
Spanish (or other approved language) through the intermediate level

+Middle East Concentration Requirements

HIS201 Introduction to the Modern Middle East

This course introduces students to the cultural, religious, social, economic and political landscape of the Middle East. It provides an in-depth look at 'traditional' society, state and culture and then highlights change and resistance to change in the period since the First World War, when European imperialism redrew the political map and westernization threatened to redraw social, cultural and religious maps.

3
One (1) 200-level regional elective approved by program director
One (1) 200- or 300-level regional elective approved by program directory
Study Away Experience or internship abroad approved by program advisor (6-12)
Arabic (or other approved Middle Eastern language) through the intermediate level